Application Configuration · bitcoin-s

Seto IPTV

The Reddit for SetoIPTV
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IdealCash

IdealCash deal coin is a Decentralized Digital Currency based on an Open-Source Peer-To-Peer Internet Protocol. It provides Proof-of-Stake (PoS) Block Generation Methods with separated target limits, granting everyone a 30% floating coin return rate! Also, transaction fee’s are extremely low, it’s only 0.0001 to transfer 10000000.00 coins!
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NEM community subreddit

NEM (New Economy Movement) is a dual-layer blockchain with 100% original source code. Launched on March 31, 2015, the NEM mainnet supports multiple ledgers on its cryptocurrency layer, and the NEM Smart Assets layer supports mosaics to represent any asset. NEM’s proprietary coin is XEM, which is harvested (mined) using a Proof-of-Importance (PoI) algorithm. This community is for discussions regarding the blockchain platform.
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10-10 01:53 - 'I searched this up on google but I got nothing applicable. What do I do? I'm using jaxx wallet and I already put the ETH address in the config file.' (i.redd.it) by /u/Patriiotiic removed from /r/Bitcoin within 70-80min

I searched this up on google but I got nothing applicable. What do I do? I'm using jaxx wallet and I already put the ETH address in the config file.
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Author: Patriiotiic
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

I just saw this one and had a doubt, does wallet leaks my IP? Does vpn requires special config for wallet? /r/Bitcoin

I just saw this one and had a doubt, does wallet leaks my IP? Does vpn requires special config for wallet? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

01-09 12:47 - 'Misleading. Bitfinex had their wallet specially configured. / Under bitgo normal config, due to their multisig architecture, no way ur coins can be stolen unless u urself were hacked' by /u/breakup7532 removed from /r/Bitcoin within 3-8min

'''
Misleading. Bitfinex had their wallet specially configured.
Under bitgo normal config, due to their multisig architecture, no way ur coins can be stolen unless u urself were hacked
'''
Context Link
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Author: breakup7532
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

how to make transactions with 0 fee in bitcoin-qt? I've set 0 fee at configs and .conf file but whenever i send it sets an amount for fee.. (it's possible because blockchain.info wallet can do it)

submitted by intrd to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Trying to Learn Bitcoin Command Line

Hello everyone, I have zero programming experience but I'm doing my best to learn how to interact with bitcoin command line. After reading several chapters and articles, I came across this website that lets me download Bitcoin core.
I'm obviously very careful of what I download since I use this computer to interface with my hardware wallet. Is this website and program safe to download and install on my computer? If it's not, can someone point me to where I can download bitcoin core? Please remember I don't have any programming experience but I'm on this journey to learn. Thank you.
https://jlopp.github.io/bitcoin-core-config-generato#config=e30=
submitted by tpmv69 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Fullnode Install Guide for Dummies ;-)

Bitcoin Fullnode Install Guide for Dummies ;-)
Feel free to stop at Level 0 or Level 1, which is fine. More advanced configs are offered to those with more tech savvy. This guide, obviously assumes a Windows 10 install, but other OSes work fine, just find a different guide. BTW, the "For Dummies" is a callback to a set of "tech" books in the 90's intended to be as easy as possible. It is in jest and not intended to insult the reader. Finally, if you dislike the formatting, a well formatted copy can be found here
There is a fairly small subset of Bitcoin users that run a full node. I think the idea of running a full node has gotten a bad rap over the years since there is so much talk about running on a Raspberry Pi, or getting zippy SSDs. Although all of this can be fun, it is often not really required at all. Here are some ways to run a full node starting with the very simple. I'll get into more complex configs, but these are all optional.

Tech Skill Level: 0 (the basics)

  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
In many cases, thats it. If your running a new machine with a fairly good internet connection, 8 or 9 hours will be enough to complete the "Initial Block Download" (IBD). This may fill up your drive a bit, but again, on most new machines, 300 GB of space isn't that hard to come by.

Tech Skill Level: 1 (encrypted wallet)

One thing we left out in the level-0 exercise is encrypting your wallet. It's easy enough to do well, but a bit more difficult to do right. The main challenge is that humans generate really poor passwords. If you want a good password, the best way is to use something called "diceware". Basically, you just grab 4 or 5 dice and each throw of the dice represents a certain word on a special list. The throw {1,4,5,3,1} for example would be the word camping on the EFF-diceware-wordlist. So you repeat this a few times until you have a list of 8 or so words which becomes the passphrase you use to encrypt your wallet. Write it down, it is always hard to remember at first. So at level-1 your list becomes:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Choose Encrypt Wallet from the Settings menu
  5. Enter your 8 word (or so) passphrase generated using the Diceware method

Wallet Encryption Dialog

Tech Skill Level: 2 (enable pruning if needed)

Though I said "300 GB of space isn't hard to come by", some times it actually is. If space is an issue, a simple way to fix it is to tell bitcoin to simple take less space. This is called "pruning" and can take that number from 300 GB down to below 5 GB. If you can't find 5 GB, then you'll have to read ahead to level-4 to add USB storage. But the good news is, enabling pruning is pretty easy, we just add another step to our working list:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Choose Options from the Settings menu
  6. Choose Prune block storage to: and select the max size for the blocks to use
  7. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Pruning Dialog
Note, even setting this to 1 GB will still leave you with about a 4.5 GB install. The blocks take up a lot of space, but the chainstate and other folders eat up at least 3.5 GB and they can't be pruned. Also, be aware, to disable pruning requires you to perform the entire IBD again. While pruned some other functions my be disabled as well, so just know that pruning does limit some functionality.

Tech Skill Level: 3 (verify the installer)

Although this is arguably something that should be done at level-0, some find the intricacies of comparing hash (thumbprint) values to be tedious and beyond the scope of a beginner. You will find these types of hash compares suggested quite often as a way to prevent running tainted programs. Programs are often tainted by bad disk or network performance, but most often, taint is malicious code inserted by viruses or malware. This is a way to guard yourself against those types of attacks.
What I cover here is a very basic comparison on the certificate, but a more thorough verification advised by mosts uses a program called Gpg4Win, and is beyond the scope of this beginners guide. But regardless, most users should strive to do this minimum level of validation.
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer
  3. When prompted "Do you want to allow..." click Show more details
  4. In the details section select Show information about the publisher's certificate
  5. In the certificate window select the Details tab
  6. In the Details tab Subject should start with "CN = Bitcoin Core Code Signing Association"
  7. Ensure Thumbprint in Details reads ea27d3cefb3eb715ed214176a5d027e01ba1ee86
  8. If the checks pass, click OK to exit the certificate window and Yes to allow the installer to run.
  9. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  10. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  11. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish

Certification Validation Windows
Note: The certificate used to sign the current Bitcoin installer is only valid from March 2020 to March 2021. After that point the thumbprint on the certificate will change. This is by design and intentional. If your reading this post after March 2021, then it is understood that the thumbprint has changed.

Tech Skill Level: 4 (use secondary storage)

We glossed over the "new machine with fairly good internet" part. Truth be known many people do not have fairly new machines, and find the IBD to take longer than the "over night" best wishes. For most people the slowdown is the disk access when calculating what is called chainstate. This requires fast random reads and writes to the disk. If you have an SSD disk, this will be no problem, but if you have a non-SSD "spinning" disk, random writes are always slow. Though an SSD will speed things up, they are pricey, so a nice middle ground may be a simple high-end USB key drive. You can get some with 10 to 15 MB/s random writes for $20 on Amazon. This is usually a order of magnitude faster than a "spinning" disk. And with pruning (see level-2), a small USB drive should be fine.
Once you decide on a drive, the tricky part will be to enable external storage. It requires editing a configuration file and adding a line. First, we want to create a directory on the key drive. You will need to determine the drive letter of your USB key drive. For the sake of this example, we will assume it is D:, but you must determine this yourself and correct the example. Once you know the drive letter, create a blank folder on the drive called Bitcoin. So for this example, creating Bitcoin on drive D: will create the path D:\Bitcoin. Once done, assuming that D: is your drive, here are the new steps including the edit of the configuration file:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the installer, verify it, then run it
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish
  6. Launch "Notepad" by typing "Notepad.exe" in the windows search bar then click Open
  7. Type the line datadir=D:\Bitcoin (depending on your drive letter) in the blank file
  8. Choose Save from the File menu in notepad
  9. Type %APPDATA%\Bitcoin\bitcoin.conf (note the percent signs) in the File name box
  10. Select All Files from the Save as type dropdown
  11. Click the Save button and overwrite the file if prompted
  12. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Save As Dialog
Now that you've reached this level of technical expertise, there are many new configuration options that you can begin to modify if you wish. Most configuration data is contained in the bitcoin.conf file and learning how to maintain it is a key step for a node operator.

Tech Skill Level: 5 (all other customizations)

Here's a short list of various things you can ADD to your bitcoin.conf file. You generally just add a new line for each configuration settings.
  • addresstype=bech32
  • changetype=bech32
The addresstype / changetype allows your wallet to use the native-segwit (bech32) format. This is the most efficient and inexpensive way to spend bitcoin, and is a recommended configuration. The default uses something called p2sh-segwit which is more compatible with older wallets, but more expensive to spend.
  • minrelaytxfee=0.00000011
Changing the minrelaytxfee setting allows you to help propagate lower fee transactions. It will require more memory but TXN memory is capped at 300 MB by default anyways, so if you have enough memory, it is a good setting to choose.
  • dbcache=2048
The dbcache setting controls how many MB of memory the program will use for the chainstate database. Since this is a key bottleneck in the IBD, setting this value high (2048 MB) will greatly speed up the IBD, assuming you have the memory to spare
  • blocksdir=C:\Bitcoin
  • datadir=D:\Bitcoin
In level-4 we discussed moving the datadir to a fast external storage, but the majority of the space used for bitcoin is the blocks directory (blocksdir). Although you should always use for fastest storage for datadir, you are free to use slow storage for blocksdir. So if you only want to consume a small amount of your SSD (assumed D:) then you can keep your blocks on your slow "spinning" drive.
  • upnp=1
One of the harder challenges you may face running a node, is to get incoming connections. If you are lucky, you may find that your firewall and network HW support the uPnP protocol. If they do, this setting will allow bitcoin to configure uPnP to allow incoming connections to your node. Other methods exist to make your node reachable, but they are well beyond the scope of this guide.
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Is it safe to allow connections on port 8333 ?

Hi,
I've just built a bitcoin core node with electrs and tor, on a spare dedicated machine. All seems good and I can connect a wallet from another machine running on the same network to the node.
However, I couldn't see my node from bitnodes.io so I then tested port 8333 from canyouseeme.org but it said "connection refused".
After lots of research, I thought it must be something wrong with iptables and tried loads of different configs, but nothing helped.
I then found these:
  1. https://askubuntu.com/questions/166068/port-seems-to-be-open-but-connection-refused
  2. https://serverfault.com/questions/78048/whats-the-difference-between-ip-address-0-0-0-0-and-127-0-0-1
  3. https://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/questions/90964/my-full-node-seems-to-be-rejecting-tor-connections
Which led me to update bitcoin.conf by changing bind=127.0.0.1 to bind=0.0.0.0, tested again and it's working inasmuch as the port can be seen (from canyouseeme.org) and I think my core node is accepting incoming connections (which I think is what you're supposed to allow - right?).
I (also think I) understand that bind=127.0.0.1 (in bitcoin.conf) is only allowing traffic from localhost and that by changing it to 0.0.0.0 is akin to wildcarding it to accept any IP, is that right?
Would appreciate someone setting me straight on this.
Cheers.
submitted by derrick-r to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Gridcoin 5.0.0.0-Mandatory "Fern" Release

https://github.com/gridcoin-community/Gridcoin-Research/releases/tag/5.0.0.0
Finally! After over ten months of development and testing, "Fern" has arrived! This is a whopper. 240 pull requests merged. Essentially a complete rewrite that was started with the scraper (the "neural net" rewrite) in "Denise" has now been completed. Practically the ENTIRE Gridcoin specific codebase resting on top of the vanilla Bitcoin/Peercoin/Blackcoin vanilla PoS code has been rewritten. This removes the team requirement at last (see below), although there are many other important improvements besides that.
Fern was a monumental undertaking. We had to encode all of the old rules active for the v10 block protocol in new code and ensure that the new code was 100% compatible. This had to be done in such a way as to clear out all of the old spaghetti and ring-fence it with tightly controlled class implementations. We then wrote an entirely new, simplified ruleset for research rewards and reengineered contracts (which includes beacon management, polls, and voting) using properly classed code. The fundamentals of Gridcoin with this release are now on a very sound and maintainable footing, and the developers believe the codebase as updated here will serve as the fundamental basis for Gridcoin's future roadmap.
We have been testing this for MONTHS on testnet in various stages. The v10 (legacy) compatibility code has been running on testnet continuously as it was developed to ensure compatibility with existing nodes. During the last few months, we have done two private testnet forks and then the full public testnet testing for v11 code (the new protocol which is what Fern implements). The developers have also been running non-staking "sentinel" nodes on mainnet with this code to verify that the consensus rules are problem-free for the legacy compatibility code on the broader mainnet. We believe this amount of testing is going to result in a smooth rollout.
Given the amount of changes in Fern, I am presenting TWO changelogs below. One is high level, which summarizes the most significant changes in the protocol. The second changelog is the detailed one in the usual format, and gives you an inkling of the size of this release.

Highlights

Protocol

Note that the protocol changes will not become active until we cross the hard-fork transition height to v11, which has been set at 2053000. Given current average block spacing, this should happen around October 4, about one month from now.
Note that to get all of the beacons in the network on the new protocol, we are requiring ALL beacons to be validated. A two week (14 day) grace period is provided by the code, starting at the time of the transition height, for people currently holding a beacon to validate the beacon and prevent it from expiring. That means that EVERY CRUNCHER must advertise and validate their beacon AFTER the v11 transition (around Oct 4th) and BEFORE October 18th (or more precisely, 14 days from the actual date of the v11 transition). If you do not advertise and validate your beacon by this time, your beacon will expire and you will stop earning research rewards until you advertise and validate a new beacon. This process has been made much easier by a brand new beacon "wizard" that helps manage beacon advertisements and renewals. Once a beacon has been validated and is a v11 protocol beacon, the normal 180 day expiration rules apply. Note, however, that the 180 day expiration on research rewards has been removed with the Fern update. This means that while your beacon might expire after 180 days, your earned research rewards will be retained and can be claimed by advertising a beacon with the same CPID and going through the validation process again. In other words, you do not lose any earned research rewards if you do not stake a block within 180 days and keep your beacon up-to-date.
The transition height is also when the team requirement will be relaxed for the network.

GUI

Besides the beacon wizard, there are a number of improvements to the GUI, including new UI transaction types (and icons) for staking the superblock, sidestake sends, beacon advertisement, voting, poll creation, and transactions with a message. The main screen has been revamped with a better summary section, and better status icons. Several changes under the hood have improved GUI performance. And finally, the diagnostics have been revamped.

Blockchain

The wallet sync speed has been DRASTICALLY improved. A decent machine with a good network connection should be able to sync the entire mainnet blockchain in less than 4 hours. A fast machine with a really fast network connection and a good SSD can do it in about 2.5 hours. One of our goals was to reduce or eliminate the reliance on snapshots for mainnet, and I think we have accomplished that goal with the new sync speed. We have also streamlined the in-memory structures for the blockchain which shaves some memory use.
There are so many goodies here it is hard to summarize them all.
I would like to thank all of the contributors to this release, but especially thank @cyrossignol, whose incredible contributions formed the backbone of this release. I would also like to pay special thanks to @barton2526, @caraka, and @Quezacoatl1, who tirelessly helped during the testing and polishing phase on testnet with testing and repeated builds for all architectures.
The developers are proud to present this release to the community and we believe this represents the starting point for a true renaissance for Gridcoin!

Summary Changelog

Accrual

Changed

Most significantly, nodes calculate research rewards directly from the magnitudes in EACH superblock between stakes instead of using a two- or three- point average based on a CPID's current magnitude and the magnitude for the CPID when it last staked. For those long-timers in the community, this has been referred to as "Superblock Windows," and was first done in proof-of-concept form by @denravonska.

Removed

Beacons

Added

Changed

Removed

Unaltered

As a reminder:

Superblocks

Added

Changed

Removed

Voting

Added

Changed

Removed

Detailed Changelog

[5.0.0.0] 2020-09-03, mandatory, "Fern"

Added

Changed

Removed

Fixed

submitted by jamescowens to gridcoin [link] [comments]

Anatomy of the Bitcoin Node filesystem

There are man explanations like this, but this one is mine.
Just in case anyone was curious. I dug up some good posts on this and thought I'd distill it as best I could. I'll be using Windows file separators, but fee free to change them in your head.
If you name a -datadir argument, this is what will land there. If one is not named it defaults to %APPDATA%\Bitcoin
If you name a -blocksdir argument, this is what will land there. If one is not named it defaults to
If you name a -walletdir argument, this is what will land there. If one is not named it defaults to \wallets or just if the wallets subdirectory doesn't exist.
  • \wallet.dat - The wallet file with private keys and UTXOs
  • \db.log - Database log of access to wallet
Note that -datadir, -blocksdir and -walletdir can all point to different storage. The things you need to keep in mind:
  1. -datadir should be your FASTEST storage
  2. -blocksdir should be your LARGEST storage
  3. -walletdir should be your most SECURE storage
As a footnote, -testnet will throw a testnet3\ in everything, and -walletdir would be assumed to refer to test.walletdir
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Cannot create wallet with Trezor

Hi guys, I am stuck trying to create a wallet for my Trezor with Electrum 4.0.4 on Linux:
I get to the point of entering the password twice and then selecting the path. But after that it just says
'Please wait' and then the window hangs. The only way to do something is either kill the process or send a `SIGINT` signal.
Interestingly after sending a SIGINT the window unfreezes and asks me again for the password (also during the whole freeze the Trezor device writes that I should enter my password). After entering the password again I get an empty error window and on closing it everything closes.
I started electrum with `electrum -v` to get some logs:
$ electrum -v I | logging | Electrum version: 4.0.4 - https://electrum.org - https://github.com/spesmilo/electrum I | logging | Python version: 3.8.6 (default, Sep 30 2020, 04:00:38) [GCC 10.2.0]. On platform: Linux-5.8.14-arch1-1-x86_64-with-glibc2.2.5 I | logging | Logging to file: None I | logging | Log filters: verbosity '*', verbosity_shortcuts '' I/p | plugin.Plugins | registering hardware bitbox02: ('hardware', 'bitbox02', 'BitBox02') I/p | plugin.Plugins | registering hardware coldcard: ('hardware', 'coldcard', 'Coldcard Wallet') I/p | plugin.Plugins | registering hardware digitalbitbox: ('hardware', 'digitalbitbox', 'Digital Bitbox wallet') I/p | plugin.Plugins | registering hardware keepkey: ('hardware', 'keepkey', 'KeepKey wallet') I/p | plugin.Plugins | registering hardware ledger: ('hardware', 'ledger', 'Ledger wallet') I/p | plugin.Plugins | registering hardware safe_t: ('hardware', 'safe_t', 'Safe-T mini wallet') I/p | plugin.Plugins | registering hardware trezor: ('hardware', 'trezor', 'Trezor wallet') I/p | plugin.Plugins | registering wallet type ('2fa', 'trustedcoin') D | util.profiler | Plugins.__init__ 0.0044 I/n | network | blockchains [0] I | exchange_rate.FxThread | using exchange CoinGecko D | util.profiler | Daemon.__init__ 0.0023 I/n | network | starting network I | daemon.Daemon | launching GUI: qt I/n | network | setting proxy None I | daemon.Daemon | starting taskgroup. I/n | network | connecting to electrumx.ftp.sh:50002:s as new interface I/n | network | starting taskgroup. I | gui.qt.history_list | could not import electrum.plot. This feature needs matplotlib to be installed. I | gui.qt.ElectrumGui | Qt GUI starting up... Qt=5.15.1, PyQt=5.15.1 I/i | interface.[localhost:50002] | connection established. version: ['ElectrumPersonalServer 0.2.0', '1.4'] D | util.profiler | ElectrumGui.__init__ 0.1374 I/i | interface.[vmd27610.contaboserver.net:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(gaierror(-2, 'Name or service not known'))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface vmd27610.contaboserver.net:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[electrumx.ftp.sh:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(gaierror(-2, 'Name or service not known'))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface electrumx.ftp.sh:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[rbx.curalle.ovh:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(gaierror(-2, 'Name or service not known'))) I/i | interface.[2AZZARITA.hopto.org:50006] | connection established. version: ['ElectrumX 1.15.0', '1.4'] I/n | network | couldn't launch iface rbx.curalle.ovh:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[2AZZARITA.hopto.org:50006] | set blockchain with height 653567 I/i | interface.[2AZZARITA.hopto.org:50006] | skipping header 653566 I/n | network | no height for main interface I/n | network | fee_estimates {25: 46526, 10: 48176, 5: 50745, 2: 50750} I/i | interface.[hsmiths4fyqlw5xw.onion:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(gaierror(-2, 'Name or service not known'))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface hsmiths4fyqlw5xw.onion:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/n | network | switching to 2AZZARITA.hopto.org:50006:s I/i | interface.[electrum3.hodlister.co:50002] | connection established. version: ['ElectrumX 1.10.0', '1.4'] I/n | network | fee_histogram [[99, 100899], [71, 112316], [61, 132563], [59, 156116], [57, 175394], [54, 114050], [51, 219092], [49, 195934], [48, 565137], [47, 781451], [46, 883591], [45, 259824], [44, 450143], [43, 114488], [42, 22100], [41, 49428], [40, 106542], [38, 151315], [33, 547095], [22, 620244], [13, 648588], [9, 822409], [5, 741398], [3, 1799486], [2, 651429]] I/n | network | fee_histogram [[99, 100899], [71, 112316], [61, 132563], [59, 156116], [57, 175394], [54, 114050], [51, 219092], [49, 195934], [48, 565137], [47, 781451], [46, 883591], [45, 259824], [44, 450143], [43, 114488], [42, 22100], [41, 49428], [40, 106542], [38, 151315], [33, 547095], [22, 620244], [13, 648588], [9, 822409], [5, 741398], [3, 1799486], [2, 651429]] I/i | interface.[bitcoin.corgi.party:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(gaierror(-5, 'No address associated with hostname'))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface bitcoin.corgi.party:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[electrumx-core.1209k.com:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(OSError(101, 'Network is unreachable'))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface electrumx-core.1209k.com:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[electrum3.hodlister.co:50002] | set blockchain with height 653567 I/i | interface.[electrum3.hodlister.co:50002] | skipping header 653567 I/n | network | fee_estimates {25: 46526, 10: 48176, 5: 50745, 2: 50749} I/i | interface.[hsmiths5mjk6uijs.onion:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(gaierror(-2, 'Name or service not known'))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface hsmiths5mjk6uijs.onion:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[dxm.no-ip.biz:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(ConnectionRefusedError(111, "Connect call failed ('77.6.34.45', 50002)"))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface dxm.no-ip.biz:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[electrum2.eff.ro:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(gaierror(-2, 'Name or service not known'))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface electrum2.eff.ro:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[electrum.hsmiths.com:50002] | disconnecting due to: ConnectError(ConnectionResetError(104, 'Connection reset by peer')) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface electrum.hsmiths.com:50002:s -- CancelledError() I | storage.WalletStorage | wallet path /home/bene/.electrum/wallets/default_wallet I/i | interface.[bitcoin.aranguren.org:50002] | connection established. version: ['ElectrumX 1.15.0', '1.4'] I | storage.WalletStorage | wallet path /home/bene/.electrum/wallets/default_wallet I/i | interface.[bitcoin.aranguren.org:50002] | set blockchain with height 653567 I/i | interface.[bitcoin.aranguren.org:50002] | skipping header 653566 [240/1884] I/n | network | fee_estimates {25: 46526, 10: 48176, 5: 50745, 2: 50749} I/i | interface.[localhost:50002] | set blockchain with height 653567 I/i | interface.[localhost:50002] | skipping header 653567 I/n | network | fee_estimates {25: 46526, 10: 48175, 5: 50745, 2: 50749} I/p | plugin.Plugins | loaded bitbox02 I/p | plugin.Plugins | loaded coldcard I/p | plugin.Plugins | loaded digitalbitbox I/p | plugin.Plugins | loaded keepkey I/p | plugin.Plugins | loaded ledger I/p | plugin.Plugins | loaded safe_t I/p | plugin.Plugins | loaded trezor I | plugin.DeviceMgr | scanning devices... D | util.profiler | DeviceMgr.scan_devices 0.0244 W | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | error getting device infos for bitbox02: Missing libraries for bitbox02. // Make sure you install it with python3 W | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | error getting device infos for coldcard: Missing libraries for coldcard. // Make sure you install it with python3 W | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | error getting device infos for keepkey: Missing libraries for keepkey. // Make sure you install it with python3 W | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | error getting device infos for ledger: Missing libraries for ledger. // Make sure you install it with python3 W | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | error getting device infos for safe_t: Missing libraries for safe_t. // Make sure you install it with python3 I | plugins.trezor.qt.Plugin | connecting to device at webusb:001:3 I | plugins.trezor.qt.Plugin | connected to device at webusb:001:3 I | plugin.DeviceMgr | Registering My TREZOF3342BDD7C90C7F9FBA58136 I | plugin.DeviceMgr | scanning devices... D | util.profiler | DeviceMgr.scan_devices 0.0388 I/i | interface.[localhost:50002] | skipping header 653567 qt.qpa.xcb: QXcbConnection: XCB error: 3 (BadWindow), sequence: 4028, resource id: 14687032, major code: 40 (TranslateCoords), minor code: 0 I | plugin.DeviceMgr | scanning devices... D | util.profiler | DeviceMgr.scan_devices 0.0407 
This is the point where the window freezes. Then I precc `Ctrl+C` to send a SIGINT signal and then this is the rest of the logs:
I/n | network | couldn't launch iface technetium.network:50002:s -- TimeoutError() I/n | network | couldn't launch iface e2.keff.org:50002:s -- TimeoutError() I/n | network | couldn't launch iface electrum-server.ninja:50002:s -- TimeoutError() I/n | network | couldn't launch iface xray587.startdedicated.de:50002:s -- TimeoutError() I/n | network | couldn't launch iface electrum.mindspot.org:50002:s -- TimeoutError() I/i | interface.[electrum.leblancnet.us:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(gaierror(-2, 'Name or service not known'))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface electrum.leblancnet.us:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[ex01.axalgo.com:50002] | succeeded in getting cert I/i | interface.[electrumx.schulzemic.net:50002] | succeeded in getting cert ^CE | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | Traceback (most recent call last): File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/base_wizard.py", line 446, in on_hw_derivation xpub = self.plugin.get_xpub(device_info.device.id_, derivation, xtype, self) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/plugins/trezotrezor.py", line 315, in get_xpub xpub = client.get_xpub(derivation, xtype) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/plugin.py", line 362, in wrapper return run_in_hwd_thread(partial(func, *args, **kwargs)) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/plugin.py", line 355, in run_in_hwd_thread return fut.result() File "/uslib/python3.8/concurrent/futures/_base.py", line 434, in result self._condition.wait(timeout) File "/uslib/python3.8/threading.py", line 302, in wait waiter.acquire() KeyboardInterrupt I/i | interface.[ex01.axalgo.com:50002] | connection established. version: ['ElectrumX 1.14.0', '1.4'] I/i | interface.[electrumx.schulzemic.net:50002] | connection established. version: ['ElectrumX 1.15.0', '1.4'] I/i | interface.[ex01.axalgo.com:50002] | set blockchain with height 653567 I/i | interface.[ex01.axalgo.com:50002] | skipping header 653567 I/n | network | fee_estimates {25: 46526, 10: 48176, 5: 50745, 2: 50749} I/i | interface.[electrumx.schulzemic.net:50002] | set blockchain with height 653567 I/i | interface.[electrumx.schulzemic.net:50002] | skipping header 653567 I/n | network | fee_estimates {25: 46526, 10: 48176, 5: 50745, 2: 50749} I/n | network | couldn't launch iface dragon085.startdedicated.de:50002:s -- TimeoutError() I/i | interface.[btc.electroncash.dk:60002] | succeeded in getting cert I/i | interface.[mxhwmwa3nt2si4ufszm24whlpkruu74jle27ys2fyjuiifbbrub6thyd.onion:50006] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(gaierror(-2, 'Name or service not known'))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface mxhwmwa3nt2si4ufszm24whlpkruu74jle27ys2fyjuiifbbrub6thyd.onion:50006:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[electrum2.villocq.com:50002] | disconnecting due to: ErrorGettingSSLCertFromServer(ConnectError(gaierror(-5, 'No address associated with hostname'))) I/n | network | couldn't launch iface electrum2.villocq.com:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[btc.electroncash.dk:60002] | connection established. version: ['ElectrumX 1.15.0', '1.4'] I/i | interface.[btc.electroncash.dk:60002] | set blockchain with height 653567 I/i | interface.[btc.electroncash.dk:60002] | skipping header 653567 I/n | network | fee_estimates {25: 46526, 10: 48176, 5: 50745, 2: 50749} I/i | interface.[btc.electrum.bitbitnet.net:50002] | connection established. version: ['ElectrumX 1.15.0', '1.4'] I/i | interface.[btc.electrum.bitbitnet.net:50002] | set blockchain with height 653567 [169/1884] I/i | interface.[btc.electrum.bitbitnet.net:50002] | skipping header 653567 I/n | network | fee_estimates {25: 46526, 10: 48176, 5: 50745, 2: 50749} I | plugin.DeviceMgr | scanning devices... D | util.profiler | DeviceMgr.scan_devices 0.0394 W | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | error getting device infos for bitbox02: Missing libraries for bitbox02. // Make sure you install it with python3 W | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | error getting device infos for coldcard: Missing libraries for coldcard. // Make sure you install it with python3 W | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | error getting device infos for keepkey: Missing libraries for keepkey. // Make sure you install it with python3 W | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | error getting device infos for ledger: Missing libraries for ledger. // Make sure you install it with python3 W | gui.qt.installwizard.InstallWizard | error getting device infos for safe_t: Missing libraries for safe_t. // Make sure you install it with python3 I/i | interface.[bitcoin.aranguren.org:50002] | skipping header 653567 E | daemon.Daemon | GUI raised exception: ReRunDialog(). shutting down. I | gui.qt.ElectrumGui | closing GUI I | daemon.Daemon | shutting down network I/n | network | stopping network I/n | network | couldn't launch iface electrum.hodlister.co:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/n | network | couldn't launch iface orannis.com:50002:s -- CancelledError() I/i | interface.[localhost:50002] | disconnecting due to: CancelledError() I/i | interface.[electrumx.schulzemic.net:50002] | disconnecting due to: CancelledError() I/i | interface.[ex01.axalgo.com:50002] | disconnecting due to: CancelledError() I/i | interface.[2AZZARITA.hopto.org:50006] | disconnecting due to: CancelledError() I/i | interface.[btc.electroncash.dk:60002] | disconnecting due to: CancelledError() I/i | interface.[electrum3.hodlister.co:50002] | disconnecting due to: CancelledError() I/i | interface.[btc.electrum.bitbitnet.net:50002] | disconnecting due to: CancelledError() I/i | interface.[bitcoin.aranguren.org:50002] | disconnecting due to: CancelledError() I/n | network | taskgroup stopped. I | daemon.Daemon | stopping taskgroup I | daemon.Daemon | taskgroup stopped. I | daemon.Daemon | removing lockfile I | daemon.Daemon | stopped E | __main__ | daemon.run_gui errored Traceback (most recent call last): File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/gui/qt/installwizard.py", line 118, in func_wrapper run_next(*out) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/base_wizard.py", line 193, in on_wallet_type self.run(action) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/base_wizard.py", line 115, in run f(*args, **kwargs) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/base_wizard.py", line 225, in choose_keystore self.choice_dialog(title=title, message=message, choices=choices, run_next=self.run) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/gui/qt/installwizard.py", line 106, in func_wrapper out = func(*args, **kwargs) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/gui/qt/installwizard.py", line 594, in choice_dialog self.exec_layout(vbox, title) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/gui/qt/installwizard.py", line 429, in exec_layout raise GoBack from None electrum.base_wizard.GoBack The above exception was the direct cause of the following exception: Traceback (most recent call last): File "/usbin/electrum", line 380, in  d.run_gui(config, plugins) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/daemon.py", line 566, in run_gui self.gui_object.main() File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/gui/qt/__init__.py", line 363, in main if not self.start_new_window(path, self.config.get('url'), app_is_starting=True): File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/gui/qt/__init__.py", line 247, in wrapper return func(self, *args, **kwargs) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/gui/qt/__init__.py", line 271, in start_new_window wallet = self._start_wizard_to_select_or_create_wallet(path) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/gui/qt/__init__.py", line 313, in _start_wizard_to_select_or_create_wallet wizard.run('new') File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/base_wizard.py", line 115, in run f(*args, **kwargs) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/base_wizard.py", line 153, in new self.choice_dialog(title=title, message=message, choices=choices, run_next=self.on_wallet_type) File "/uslib/python3.8/site-packages/electrum/gui/qt/installwizard.py", line 131, in func_wrapper raise ReRunDialog() from e electrum.base_wizard.ReRunDialog I/p | plugin.Plugins | stopped 
submitted by bIacktemplar to Electrum [link] [comments]

[ Bitcoin ] Anatomy of the Bitcoin Node filesystem

Topic originally posted in Bitcoin by brianddk [link]
There are man explanations like this, but this one is mine.
Just in case anyone was curious. I dug up some good posts on this and thought I'd distill it as best I could. I'll be using Windows file separators, but fee free to change them in your head.
If you name a -datadir argument, this is what will land there. If one is not named it defaults to %APPDATA%\Bitcoin
If you name a -blocksdir argument, this is what will land there. If one is not named it defaults to
  • \blocks\blk*.dat - The raw block data
  • \blocks\rev*.dat - The Undo files. List of spent UTXOs for each block
If you name a -main.walletdir argument, this is what will land there. If one is not named it defaults to \wallets or just if the wallets subdirectory doesn't exist.
  • \wallet.dat - The wallet file with private keys and UTXOs
  • \db.log - Database log of access to wallet
Note that -datadir, -blocksdir and -main.walletdir can all point to different storage. The things you need to keep in mind:
  1. -datadir should be your FASTEST storage
  2. -blocksdir should be your LARGEST storage
  3. -main.walletdir should be your most SECURE storage
As a footnote, testnet will through a testnet3\ in everything, and would require a -test.walletdir switch to set the wallet directory.
brianddk your post has been copied because one or more comments in this topic have been removed. This copy will preserve unmoderated topic. If you would like to opt-out, please send a message using [this link].
[deleted comment]
submitted by anticensor_bot to u/anticensor_bot [link] [comments]

GPU or Asic mining

Ok, A little backround. I know hardware and networking. I can build just about any config of a computer. I understand overclocking and undervolting. I can invest around 2,700 for initial investment.
So do I buy hardware to build a GPU miner with at least 6 cards or more? Probably RX580 as they are cheap and I have one in my rig. More on that later.
Or do I a Asic miner like this I understand a GPU miner is multiple coins and not Bitcoin, and Asic is nothing but Bitcoin.
I've done the math on the Asic miner and the ROI in about 3 months with a net gain of about ~10,000 USD a year @ .13 cents per Watt.
I've had a hard time finding a solid or semi way of calculating the earnings for a GPU miner. Not only because it is many coins or dedicated to one coin, but there our other variables involved. However I have more control of the hardware if it fails.
I dipped my toe into mining with my own rig that has a RX580 fatboy and a AMD Phenom ii x4 955 black edition. I overclocked the GPU and undervolted the CPU to reduce heat since it was hitting 62 cel.
The GPU gets 12.5 sol/s and the CPU was getting ~322 h/s. All this added up to ~170 watts and a net of .00218322 BTC/Month. This was all done using Cudo as it was easy to find and setup just to test. This was just a test to see how it would work. I wouldn't use Cudo to full scale as it is a pool and the transfer to a Wallet is pretty steep in relationship to earns. I understand that in a pool you get your share based upon how much of the "work" you did to get find block.
So do I build or buy? With that much computation power do I need to join a pool? What software is best for pool or alone? I am comfortable with CLI as long as it's well documented, but would like a remote GUI.
Also what is the best wallet with the best fees for transactions. Currently using uphold since I use Brave.
I think I covered as much as I could, if you have any questions let me know. Any advice would be great. If I should post this else where let me know please or I could just cross post it.
TIA. Be safe, stay safe!
Edit: Words and BTC earning was WAY off then I first typed this.
submitted by P_Munky to bitcoinhardware [link] [comments]

[PSA] Electrum and Eclair both support Testnet-LN to learn about LN

Update

I rewrote this post to clean it up a bit and add more context.
With the last few drops of Electrum it's been much easier to use LN. I've played around with Electrum-desktop on testnet. Everything worked great, and it is a great way to learn about channel capacity and invoices without having to put real money at risk. Electrum has a "swap" button to adjust capacity but I think it may be broken on testnet presently. There are a few ways to adjust capacity / liquidity that I'll discuss below.

Get Electrum running

  1. Install Electrum 4.0.2 and run it on testnet enabling LN.
  2. Get testnet BTC and send it to Electrum
  3. Open a channel in Electrum with either a known entity, or use their channel suggestion
  4. Wait an hour or so for the channel to open.
  5. Perform a submarine-swap operation to give you a 50/50 capacity
  6. Wait for the swap to complete

Balance capacity

LN channels have a (local) sending capacity and a (remote) receiving capacity. To verify your local/remote capacity click on the channel and view "Details". New channels default to 100%/0% local/remote capacity, meaning you can send, but not receive. There is also some rule that requires you to be below 90% local before you can receive anything. So if you need to receive payments on LN before you spend 10% of your local capacity you will need to find a way to balance local/remote. As mentioned before, the easiest is just to spend (try starblocks), but if you don't have anything to spend on there are some other options

Test Node Visibility

Once you free up some receive capacity, you also need to ensure that your node is reachable. In the default config your node will not be publicly visible. Electrum will handle the last hop for you, but your sender still need to at least be able to route to one of the nodes you have receive capacity on. This may occationally fail causing "Path not found" errots when sending, or when others send to you. In the Electrum preferences there are some options to run local watchtowers and keep the app resident. This will help since your wallet needs to be running for it to receive payments. But even if you enable all options sometimes you will just end up on an isolated node. If this happens, take care to ensure you connect to nodes that are highly connected to others (view 1ml highly connect list).
If you want to test your visibility, just paste an invoice in this thread and hopefully someone can try to send you some tBTC-LN.
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Staking in Compendia and how its approach differs from other (D)PoS networks

In this article, we'll be discussing staking and how it works in Compendia.
There are several misconceptions out there that arise due to the way staking is utilized across different networks. Compendia use a novel way of staking, by combining the way it locks funds to earn more coins in recent proof-of-stake (PoS) networks - with the aspect of vote power traditionally seen in delegated proof-of-stake (DPoS) networks.
Staking in (D)PoS networks vs. Compendia
Staking (commonly misspelt as 'stacking' or 'steaking') is the process of leveraging an acquired amount of coins/tokens from a certain blockchain to contribute to the network, by holding them in an address and using an (either online or offline) wallet client to earn revenue based on the amount of coins/tokens held.
PoS (proof-of-stake) networks
In traditional proof-of-stake networks such as Stratis or Cardano requires users to purchase a certain amount of coins, place those in an online wallet and letting the wallet client emulate a certain amount of computing power - which is in turn used to mine/forge new blocks to the blockchain. In more recent proof-of-stake networks such as Cosmos, users are required to lock their funds in an address - with a cooldown period added when wanting to unlock those funds. This way, coins are taken out of circulation rather than just being held (but still immediately spendable) as with Stratis/Cardano. In both situations, anyone can contribute to the network by staking and the more coins staked, the higher likelihood of mining/forging a new block and earning the block reward. You can earn individually from staking, or join a pool.
DPoS (delegated proof-of-stake) networks
In delegated proof-of-stake networks, such as ARK or EOS, there are only a set number of nodes (known as validators, block producers or delegates) that are allowed to forge new blocks. In ARK, there are 51 forging delegates and we will use this amount as an example. Contributors have to gain votes from other network participants, who pledge their account balance as votes, and once they have a total amount of votes that put them into the top 51, they will be able to forge blocks and earn rewards. The account balance of participants who vote for a forging validator remain unlocked and therefore it is possible to immediately spend funds held in an address. The amount of votes per address varies across different DPoS networks, but the principle is the same: one coin means one vote power. You can only earn individually if you are one of the top validators; otherwise, you have to vote and receive a portion of rewards from a forging validator.
Compendia
In Compendia, the above two methods are combined into a new dynamic: staking your BIND locks up your funds for a set period (3 - 6 - 12 months) as in proof-of-stake networks, but it does NOT grant the ability to earn. You will still need to vote for a sharing validator, like in delegated proof-of-stake networks. What does staking do then, if it does not let you earn on its own?
Staking your BIND for a set period applies a multiple (5x - 7.5x - 10x) to the voting power of your staked balance. This means that one staked BIND is no longer counted as one vote, but as 5 votes (or 7.5 votes, or 10 votes - depending on the lock period). This way it increases your potential earnings when you vote for a sharing validator. So, by pledging to lock your funds for a certain amount of time and thereby decreasing the circulating amount of BIND, you will be able to earn more with the same amount of coins than if you would not stake, and only vote.
When staking, your BIND will go through 5 different phases:
Securing the Network
DPoS delegates/validators secure the blockchain through forging blocks, and in the case of Compendia, there are 47 validators (rather than the 51 in ARK) and each active validator forges one block every 6 seconds. Therefore 47 new blocks are forged every 4.7 minutes (6 * 47 = 282 seconds = 4.7 minutes). In a similar way to proof-of-work networks such as Bitcoin, a block contains transactions and the validator that forges them receives a proportion of the transaction fee (described in the Fee Removal Model further below).
Supply Inflation
DPoS chains typically have fixed inflation based over several years, this is to help control the coin supply in circulation. Inflation comes from Delegate/Validators forging new blocks as described above. The effect of validators forging new blocks increases the supply by either ß3.9 per block (if ranked 6th to 47th), or ß4.84 per block (if ranked 1st to 5th).
The Compendia blockchain produces around ß1,753,200 - Per month
Block rewards are controlled through an annual milestone which is fixed in the current networks config. This can only be updated if the 47 validators reach consensus and accept the potential change.
The milestones for BIND are as follows:
Years Rewards (6-47) Rewards (Top 5) Average
1-3 3.9 4.84 4
4-6 1.95 2.42 2
7-9 0.975 1.21 1
Deflationary Effects
In general DPoS blockchains allow voters to vote, allocating their wallet weight to a specific delegate/validator and receiving rewards commensurate to weight. This helps control inflation as the coins are out of supply when being used to vote, but the coins are not locked for a fixed time, a voter can move some or all funds at any time.
What differentiates Compendia?
The key difference is that staked coins are locked for a fixed period, either 3, 6, or 12 months (as described above). The coins are effectively locked out of supply, by incentivising voters to lock their coins for the maximum period of 12 months. This helps offset the increase in supply through forging rewards.
At the time of writing, ß11,816,021 is currently locked into staking, given the current BIND supply (i.e nOS to BIND) ß112,894,676, around 10% of all BIND in circulation is locked out of supply for the staking periods highlighted earlier. With the current staked coins, it would take just over 6 months for inflation to offset the monthly forging reward increase.
Fee removal model.
Compendia also offer another deflationary measure through a sophisticated fee removal model.
The Fee Collection and Removal Model works as follows:
- 100% of collected fees up to the amount equal to the block reward in a block are permanently removed from circulation.
- 50% of any remaining collected fees are also removed from circulation.
- The other 50% is awarded to the forging validator.
This fee system helps with combating possible shifts in Vote Power going from voters towards validators during times of increased transaction activity on the network.
Summary
The Compendia Team has a clear understanding of the tokenomics of a blockchain, lessons have been learned from earlier DPoS implementations and new strategies have been deployed to ensure a fairer, more balanced approach to DPoS tokenomics.
If you have enjoyed reading this blog please consider voting for validators BFX & Cryptomanic. Thank you
submitted by c_ryptomaniac to Compendia [link] [comments]

Created a full node + Lightning node from scratch.

So i created a full node and a lightning node from scratch.
Coming back to bitcoin after few years, i wanted to see what the lightning network was.
So i changed my vps to a dedicated server (to add more storage) and started my journey.
The first thing was to install the full node. there's some nice ressources to do that, but you have to find them. I started with https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node#other-linux-daemon but the cli instructions are almost non existent. I then found https://github.com/BlockchainCommons/Learning-Bitcoin-from-the-Command-Line which is great! Protip: you have to create a config file by yourself. I created a wallet and waited for the blockchain to finish downloading.
Then i added a lightning node. I used lnd because i like the go language. The program is great but i found the user documentation lacking. https://gist.github.com/bretton/0b22a0503a9eba09df86a23f3d625c13 is a nice ressource, but you don't need to set an rpc user, lnd will use the cookie auth automagically if you're running as the same user as bitcoind (and provide bitcoind path probably..?). Protip: To create a qrcode with your lightning address you can use qrencode: lncli newaddress p2wkh qrencode -o address.png 'bitcoin:bc1youraddress...'
Once everything looked to run smoothly i wanted to add funds to my lightning wallet. Protip: you can directly transfer fund to it. no need to transfer funds in your full node wallet (don't know why i did that..).
I manually opened few channels with other nodes, but using the autopilot feature from lnd seems to work fine.
Lastly, i wanted some sort of dashboard so i added https://github.com/djmelik/lndash because i'm fluent in python , the project is straightforward, read only, and good looking.
You can check my node at https://ln.xec.sh/
If you have any questions or remark, don't hesitate. Hope it can help someone else.
submitted by wiredmachine to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Test

Test
There is a fairly small subset of Bitcoin users that run a full node. I think the idea of running a full node has gotten a bad rap over the years since there is so much talk about running on a Raspberry Pi, or getting zippy SSDs. Although all of this can be fun, it is often not really required at all. Here are some ways to run a full node starting with the very simple. I'll get into more complex configs, but these are all optional.

Tech Skill Level: 0 (the basics)

  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
In many cases, thats it. If your running a new machine with a fairly good internet connection, 8 or 9 hours will be enough to complete the "Initial Block Download" (IBD). This may fill up your drive a bit, but again, on most new machines, 300 GB of space isn't that hard to come by.

Tech Skill Level: 1 (encrypted wallet)

One thing we left out in the level-0 exercise is encrypting your wallet. It's easy enough to do well, but a bit more difficult to do right. The main challenge is that humans generate really poor passwords. If you want a good password, the best way is to use something called "diceware". Basically, you just grab 4 or 5 dice and each throw of the dice represents a certain word on a special list. The throw {1,4,5,3,1} for example would be the word camping on the EFF-diceware-wordlist. So you repeat this a few times until you have a list of 8 or so words which becomes the passphrase you use to encrypt your wallet. Write it down, it is always hard to remember at first. So at level-1 your list becomes:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Choose Encrypt Wallet from the Settings Menu
  5. Enter your 8 word (or so) passphrase generated using the Diceware method

Wallet Encryption Dialog

Tech Skill Level: 2 (enable pruning if needed)

Though I said "300 GB of space isn't hard to come by", some times it actually is. If space is an issue, a simple way to fix it is to tell bitcoin to simple take less space. This is called "pruning" and can take that number from 300 GB down to below 5 GB. If you can't find 5 GB, then you'll have to read ahead to level-3 to add USB storage. But the good news is, enabling pruning is pretty easy, we just add another step to our working list:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer and install the app
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Choose Options from the Settings Menu
  6. Choose Prune block storage to: and select the max size for the blocks to use
  7. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Pruning Dialog
Note, even setting this to 1 GB will still leave you with about a 4.5 GB install. The blocks take up a lot of space, but the chainstate and other folders eat up at least 3.5 GB and they can't be pruned. Also, be aware, to disable pruning requires you to perform the entire IBD again. While pruned some other functions my be disabled as well, so just know that pruning does limit some functionality.

Tech Skill Level: 3 (verify the installer)

Although this is arguably something that should be done at level-0, some find the intricacies of comparing hash (thumbprint) values to be tedious and beyond the scope of a beginner. You will find these types of hash compares suggested quite often as a way to prevent running tainted programs. Programs are often tainted by bad disk or network performance, but most often, taint is malicious code inserted by viruses or malware. This is a way to guard yourself against those types of attacks. What I cover here is a very basic comparison on the certificate, but a more thorough comparison advised by mosts uses a program called Gpg4Win, and is beyond the scope of this beginners guide. But regardless, most users should strive to do this minimum level of validation.
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the downloaded installer
  3. When prompted "Do you want to allow..." click Show more details
  4. In the details section select Show information about the publisher's certificate
  5. In the certificate window select the Details tab
  6. In the Details tab Subject should start with "CN = Bitcoin Core Code Signing Association"
  7. Also ensure Thumbprint reads ea27d3cefb3eb715ed214176a5d027e01ba1ee86
  8. If the checks pass, click OK to exit the certificate window and Yes to allow the installer to run.
  9. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  10. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  11. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish

Certification Validation Windows
Note: The certificate used to sign the current Bitcoin installer is only valid from March 2020 to March 2021. After that point the thumbprint on the certificate will change. This is by design and intentional. If your reading this post after March 2021, then it is understood that the thumbprint has changed.

Tech Skill Level: 4 (use secondary storage)

We glossed over the "new machine with fairly good internet" part. Truth me known many people do not have fairly new machines, and find the IBD to take longer than the "over night" best wishes. For most people the slowdown is the disk access when calculating what is called chainstate. This requires fast random reads and writes to the disk. If you have an SSD disk, this will be no problem, but if you have a non-SSD "spinning" disk, random writes are always slow. Though an SSD will speed things up, they are pricey, so a nice middle ground may be a simple high-end USB key drive. You can get some with 10 to 15 MB/s random writes which is usually a order of magnitude faster than a "spinning" disk. And with pruning (see level-2), a small USB drive should be fine.
Once you decide on a drive, the tricky part will be to enable external storage. It requires editing a configuration file and adding a few lines. The configuration file needs to be in both the default directory, and USB key drive, but before we do that, we want to create a directory on the key drive. You will need to determine the drive letter of your USB key drive. For the sake of this example, we will assume it is D:, but you must determine this yourself and correct the example. Once you know the drive letter, create a blank folder on the drive called Bitcoin. So for this example, creating Bitcoin on drive D: will create the path D:\Bitcoin. Once done, assuming that D: is your drive, here are the steps to edit the two configuration files:
  1. Download Bitcoin Core
  2. Launch the installer, verify it, then run it
  3. Launch the installed "Bitcoin Core" app and let it run overnight
  4. Do the wallet encryption steps here if you wish
  5. Do the optional pruning steps here if you wish
  6. Launch "Notepad" by typing "Notepad.exe" in the windows search bar then click Open
  7. Type the line datadir=D:\Bitcoin (depending on your drive letter) in the blank file
  8. Choose Save from the File menu in notepad
  9. Type %APPDATA%\Bitcoin\bitcoin.conf (note the percent signs) in the File name box
  10. Select All Files from the Save as type dropdown
  11. Click the Save button and overwrite the file if prompted
  12. Exit and restart the bitcoin application for the changes to take effect

Save As Dialog
Now that you've reached this level of technical expertise, there are many new configuration options that you can begin to modify if you wish. Most configuration data is contained in the bitcoin.conf file and learning how to maintain it is a key step for a node operator.

Tech Skill Level: 5 (all other customizations)

Here's a short list of various things you can ADD to your bitcoin.conf file. You generally just add a new line for each configuration settings.
  • addresstype=bech32
  • changetype=bech32
The addresstype / changetype allows your wallet to use the native-segwit (bech32) format. This is the most efficient and inexpensive way to spend bitcoin, and is a recommended configuration. The default uses something called p2sh-segwit which is more compatible with older wallets, but more expensive to spend.
  • minrelaytxfee=0.00000011
Changing the minrelaytxfee setting allows you to help propagate lower fee transactions. It will require more memory but TXN memory is capped at 300 MB by default anyways, so if you have enough memory, it is a good setting to choose.
  • dbcache=2048
The dbcache setting controls how many MB of memory the program will use for the chainstate database. Since this is a key bottleneck in the IBD, setting this value high (2048 MB) will greatly speed up the IBD, assuming you have the memory to spare
  • blocksdir=C:\Bitcoin
  • datadir=D:\Bitcoin
In level-4 we discussed moving the datadir to a fast external storage, but the majority of the space used for bitcoin is the blocks directory (blocksdir). Although you should always use for fastest storage for datadir, you are free to use slow storage for blocksdir. So if you only want to consume a small amount of your SSD (assumed D:) then you can keep your blocks on your slow "spinning" drive.
  • upnp=1
One of the harder challenges you may face running a node, is to get incoming connections. If you are lucky, you may find that your firewall and network HW support the uPnP protocol. If they do, this setting will allow bitcoin to configure uPnP to allow incoming connections to your node.
submitted by brianddk to brianddk [link] [comments]

Accessing wallet never connected to Bitcoin Core

Hey there,
I've made a rookie error and deposited coins into a wallet which never connected to Bitcoin Core. I get that this is completely my fault, but would appreciate some help if possible.
What I did
I followed the installation instructions listed here for macOS. Everything seemed to run smoothly. I began tinkering with the joinmarket.cfg config and inadvertently set my blockchain_source to no-blockchain. I generated a wallet using the python wallet-tool.py generate command and then listed my addresses using the python wallet-tool.py wallet.jmdat command. I deposited Bitcoin into one of my addresses before realising that I wasn't correctly connecting to Bitcoin Core. When I set the blockchain_source back to bitcoin-rpc I get an error stating Failure of RPC connection to Bitcoin Core. Application cannot continue, shutting down. when attempting to run `python joinmarket-qt.py.
What should I do?
I'm not entirely sure how I am meant to be connecting to Bitcoin Core and if once I do connect, I'll be able to access my funds deposited to the wallet address listed earlier.
Would I be better off somehow exporting this wallet to another program (or whatever that process is)?
Any advice would be appreciated. Let me know if you have any questions.
Cheers!
submitted by Beardo01 to joinmarket [link] [comments]

Inject service provider in a custom rule

Hi all,
I've created a Bitcoin wallet validation rule. It needs to use a Provider, a wrapper to Bitcoin RPC functions. How to inject such dependency in the class? The BitcoinRPC service class is registered as a singleton as it needs to be initialised with certain parameters (RPC host and port mainly).
This is the Rule class:
class ValidateBtcWallet implements Rule
{
....public function passes($attribute, $value, BitcoinRPC $btc_rpc)
....{
........return $btc_rpc->validate($value);
....}
....public function message()
....{
........return 'You may want to double check your BTC wallet address.';
....}
}
and this is the custom service provider
class BitcoinRPCSeviceProvider extends ServiceProvider
{
....public function register()
....{
........$config = config('bitcoin');
........$bitcoin = new bitcoind($config['rpc_host'], $config['rpc_port']);
........$this->app->singleton(BitcoinRPC::class, function ($app) use ($bitcoin)
........{
............return new BitcoinRPC($bitcoin);
........});
....}
....public function provides() {
........return [BitcoinRPC::class];
....}
}
submitted by defineNothing to laravel [link] [comments]

Building an Ethereum Mining Rig (13 GPU) - 4th part

Third update to the guide "Building a Mining Rig for Ethereum". The absolute first guide to building a RX Vega 64 8gb 13 GPU Mining Rig.
Reading this guide to building a 13 GPU Ethereum mining rig requires adequate knowledge of building and running an Ethereum Mining Rig. We therefore recommend a previous view of our Guide to build a Mining Rig and related updates.

Let's immediately list the hardware used:

- Asus Mining Master X370 mainboard
- Core i5 Coffee Lake CPU
- 480 or 500GB SSD
- 32Gb Ram
- 13 GPU RX Vega 64 8Gb
- 3 x 1000W power supplies
- 1 1200W power supply
- 8Gb USB stick

In this guide we will obviously not explain how to mount the hardware of a Rig. The only notes we wish to underline are the following:

- the 1200W power supply must be the primary one on which to connect 4 GPUs and the video output for the monitor

- all the risers, as well as obviously the GPUs, must be powered through the 8-pole connections of the power supplies. We strongly advise against the use of 6-pole ports. Therefore, have the appropriate number of cables available for all connections. Risers can also be powered in pairs.

- the model of the video card used is the Asus Rog Strixx Gaming RX Vega 64 8Gb


The operating system is Windows 10 updated to the latest version available. The tool for creating installation media is available at the following link https://www.microsoft.com/it-it/software-download/windows10 to be able to use the USB key as a launcher for installing Windows 10 .

With the Asus Mining Master, the GPU risers can be connected directly to the motherboard via the USB cable, thus making one of the small components of the riser kits unusable.

After making all the connections on the motherboard, check that all GPUs are highlighted in green when the PC starts up. If not, move the USB cable on the motherboard one position. It may take at least 2 or 3 attempts.

Ethereum mining with 13 GPUs
Having solved this possible small inconvenience, let's proceed with the installation of the AMD Adrenaline 2020 drivers, always updated to the latest version, relating to the RX Vega Series.

If you want to proceed with more caution, the advice is to disconnect all the GPUs (remembering the locations of the USB cables) except one before installing the drivers.

The mining will be carried out on the Ethermine pool, our favorite, using the Claymore 15 software.


Once the download is complete, you will have to unzip the folder on the desktop and open the start.bat file contained in the Claymore folder using Notepad. The procedure is the usual one: delete the content and copy-paste the following command string:

start config.dll -epool eu1.ethermine.org:14444 -ewal "your ETH wallet address" -epsw x -worker "worker"
EthDcrMiner64.exe

Where EthDcrMiner64.exe is the executable, -epool indicates the pool to mine and its port, -ewal is the wallet address and -epsw is the password that we leave blank (X).

In place of "your wallet address" you will have to put your Ethererum wallet and instead of worker you will enter an identification number in case you plan to build more RIGs (such as RIG1, RIG2, etc ...).

At the following link, many other useful commands for your Rig:
https://github.com/Claymore-Dual/Claymore-Dual-Miner

Try to run mining and check that the system is stable.

In the Payouts section, after a few minutes of mining, you can decide the minimum amount of Ether to be sent to your wallet by simply entering the IP address of the RIG.

We performed the mining directly on the Ethereum address of the Exodus wallet. Coinbase is not supported.

Overclocking with OverdriveNTool
Let's proceed now with the download of OverdrivenTool at the following link: https://forums.guru3d.com/threads/overdriventool-tool-for-amd-gpus.416116/


For those unfamiliar with it, we recommend reading our software guide.

For those who do not intend to experiment or do not completely trust their software experience, at the following link you can view the settings on the parameters of the GPUs and the RAM of the GPUs - and other small tricks - to obtain the best possible performance without forcing the cards too much. video.

On our Youtube channel (subscribe numerous !!!) you will now be able to see the video relating to the start of mining and the one concerning the stabilization phase.

To better cool the Rig we have also installed fans for the extraction of heat as caution is never too much. Moreover, there is also an aesthetic gain.

Conclusions on the guide to build a 13 gpu ethereum mining rig.
Finally, we conclude this guide by reporting what everyone was waiting for (we do not say how long we had to wait before obtaining this result) the video link complhttps: //www.youtube.com/watch? V = k53XZn3zc9I & t = 61seto del Rig e del Mining .

We remain available for any advice, both on pools, on yield and on consumption.

Feel free to contact us in case you run into any problems where our guide to Building a 13 GPU Ethereum Mining Rig has not been completely helpful.

See you soon.


If you liked this article and would like to contribute with a donation:

Bitcoin: 1Ld9b165ZYHZcY9eUQmL9UjwzcphRE5S8Z
Ethereum: 0x8D7E456A11f4D9bB9e6683A5ac52e7DB79DBbEE7
Litecoin: LamSRc1jmwgx5xwDgzZNoXYd6ENczUZViK
Stellar: GBLDIRIQWRZCN5IXPIKYFQOE46OG2SI7AFVWFSLAHK52MVYDGVJ6IXGI
Ripple: rUb8v4wbGWYrtXzUpj7TxCFfUWgfvym9xf

By: cryptoall.it
Telegram Channel: t.me/giulo75
Netbox Browser: https://netbox.global/PZn5A
Horizen Faucet: https://getzen.cash/auth/register?ref=153228
submitted by Giulo75 to u/Giulo75 [link] [comments]

What I currently use for privacy

So this is what software I currently use for privacy, would like some opinions if possible:
Starting with my cellphone, my device is a Google Pixel 3A XL with GrapheneOS flashed, I have the following apps installed:
F-Droid and AuroraOSS (as my app stores), NewPipe (youtube client), Vanadium (web browser), Tutanota and K-9 Mail (for e-mails), OsmAnd+ (for maps), Joplin (notes), Open Camera (camera), OpenBoard and Mozc for Android (Keyboard and Japanese Keyboard), Aegis Authenticator, KeePassDX (password manager), LibreTorrent (torrent client), Librera PRO (pdf/epub/mobi reader, I don't own a Kindle nor want to own one so I use my cellphone to read), Tachiyomi (manga reader), Signal (for messaging), Vinyl Music Player, VLC, Simple Gallery Pro and Simple Calendar Pro (I prefer them over stock Graphene options) and I also use Electrum and Samourai (Bitcoin Wallet) and Monerujo (Monero Wallet)
I also have OpenVPN (for VPN) and use a private DNS for ad and tracking blocking (provided by my VPN provider)
I have 3-4 PCs, will go over every single one of them:
my main PC is a desktop PC (that I built myself) that I mainly use for working and other tasks.
It runs Artix Linux (basically Arch Linux without systemd), I use UFW as my firewall (denying all incoming and also denying all outgoing only allowing what is useful) and I also use AppArmor Profiles, I disabled IPV6 and SWAP, configured my VPN connection as well on network settings and I currently run OpenVPN on my computer (my VPN provider allows for multi-hop cascade through OpenVPN in which I can create a custom VPN cascade up to four servers, each consecutive hop re-encrypts my traffic and assigns me a new IP address) and I've also set disk encryption on installation (have set in all of my computers)
As for software: I use Mozilla Firefox as my web browser (I set it to always be in private mode, unchecked suggestions for browsing history, bookmarks, and open tabs, I've also disabled the Firefox data collection in settings and block dangerous and deceptive content, I use DuckDuckGo as my search engine, I use Firefox Home as my default as my homepage. The rest of my tweaks were done in about:config (using privacytools.io site tweaks + geo.enabled = false, network.cookie.lifetimePolicy = 2 and dom.security.https_only_mode as true which are not listed on the site) and the only addons I use are uBlock Origin on Hard Mode and Decentraleyes), KeePassXC (password manager), VIM (use it as a Text Editor and as an IDE for coding), LibreOffice (for working stuff), GIMP (image editor), VLC, qBitTorrent and Tutanota's Desktop Client and Thunderbird (for e-mails)
I also use KVM/QEMU for virtual machines (usually in case I wanna test some distro or use Tails/Whonix)
For my gaming PC (also a desktop I've built myself) I run Manjaro KDE on it, the only apps I have in the system are Firefox (same settings as above), OBS and KVM/QEMU (which I use a Win10 virtual machine for games, there are tutorials on YouTube on how to do so if you're interested). I have the same firewall settings as above, using AppArmor as well and I've also disabled IPV6 and SWAP, I run OpenVPN on it as well as my VPN DNS settings on network settings. I also use different mouse and keyboard on both my PCs and never mix them together.
My other 2 PCs are both laptops, one is a Acer Aspire Nitro I've bought for work (in case I need to work while in a trip or if I wanna work outside etc), it has the same settings and programs as my main PC but I run Gentoo on it. The other laptop is an old ThinkPad that runs Slackware on it, but I rarely use it and this laptop is most of the times not with me for safety reasons.
For some other devices and stuff: I have an Asus RT-AC86U router with OpenWRT flashed on it that I also run OpenVPN config files (this one coming from another provider, I use two VPN providers, on in my PCs and the other in my router), I have a Ledger Nano S as a hardware wallet for both Bitcoin and Monero (most of my cryptocurrency is there, I use hardware wallet for hodling purposes and as my emergency funding) and I have LOTS of USB flash drivers (all of them for Linux Live ISOs purposes), I also have a Nintendo Switch Lite (only gaming console I have, although have not been playing that much on it recently) that I only connect to the internet in case I need to download some updates or play online and after I'm done I immediately disconnect it from the internet.
Some other privacy habits I have are:
I don't own any smart device like Smart TVs (I've been more than 10 years now without watching TV, doesn't even bother me), Smart Fridges or Dishwashers that connect to your internet, ROOMBAS, Smart Home etc, I keep all my money on crypto (and I have a small amount in gold as well, but I rarely invest on it, all my gold is stored in a manual safe here in my apartment) and I only have like, 10 bucks or so in my back account (as soon as I receive any money I just left the necessary in my account to pay bills and put all the rest on crypto, I try to pay everything on crypto or cash), I RARELY use cloud storage, but if I need to, I go with NextCloud and encrypt all my files with VeraCrypt before uploading it, all my VPN services were paid with Bitcoin (I try to pay everything with crypto as previously said) and I never write directly into any website, I usually write my text on a text editor, copy it and paste it on the website (needless to say that I don't use mainstream social media as well)
So, what do you guys think? anything that you would add your recommend me? (before anyone mentions about self-hosting a DNS server using Pi-hole on a Raspberry Pi, I'm actually thinking on doing it in a near future)
EDIT: forgot to mention that I don't watch YouTube on PC on youtube site, I mostly watch youtube's videos on invidio.us and only use the youtube site for watching live streams honestly. And I also barely go outside with my smartphone (only if I really need to) and I usually keep it away from my computers etc.
EDIT 2: also another thing: I covered all my laptop's webcams with black electrical tape, I have a Logitech C922 Pro webcam for my desktop PCs but rarely use it, and when I need to use it, I unplug it as soon as I'm done with it.
submitted by SlackAcademic to privacytoolsIO [link] [comments]

Building an Ethereum Mining Rig - Part 2

First update to the guide "Building a 6Gpu Mining Rig for Ethereum" - Let's talk about Claymore.
This update supplements and does not replace the Guide to Build a 6GPU Mining Rig for Ethereum published on our site.

The substantial differences are due to the installation of the latest version of the Windows 10 Operating System, the mining on the Ethermine pool (in our opinion simpler than Dwarfpool) and the use of the XFX RX 580 8gb GPUs.

The first variant is found in Part 4 of the guide: the environment variables are not to be entered as they will be integrated directly into the bat file to start mining.

The second variant is found in Part 7 of the guide and leads us to "mine" on a different pool using the Claymore software.
Download the latest version at the following link: https://github.com/Claymore-Dual/Claymore-Dual-Miner

Once downloaded, unzip everything on a folder on your desktop and open the start.bat file with notepad. Clear the contents and copy the following command:

start config.dll -epool eu1.ethermine.org:14444 -ewal "your ETH wallet address" -epsw x -worker "worker"
EthDcrMiner64.exe

Where instead of "your wallet address" you will have to put your Ethererum wallet - obviously without the quotes - and instead of worker you will put an identification number in case you build more RIGs (such as RIG1, RIG2, etc ...). We opted for the eu1 pool even if some on the discussion forums believe that the us1 is more profitable.

At the following link, many other useful commands for your Rig:
https://github.com/Claymore-Dual/Claymore-Dual-Miner


The Ethermine pool offers a very well crafted and descriptive interface. In the Payouts section, after only 5 minutes of mining, you can decide the minimum amount of Ether to be transferred to your wallet by simply entering the IP address of the RIG.

We have decided to mine directly on the Ethereum address of our Exodus wallet. It is not recommended to mine directly on Coinbase, as reported on the site itself. Sin.

Nothing should be left to chance when you decide to build a mining rig for Ethereum.
The third variant is the most difficult of all. Once you have reached Part 5 of the guide, you can decide whether to continue or follow this update / variant. If you are here it is probably because you have run into some problem that the guide does not allow you to solve.

With the latest version of Windows 10, you may run into a kernel conflict between the operating system and AMD's Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition Beta for Blockchain Compute drivers. This conflict will prevent you from using Atiflash after installing the drivers.

Important: Before making any changes to the BIOS, please backup each GPU.

Important: first of all flash the GPUs with the original bios if for any reason you are forced to reinstall the operating system.


Still on Atiflash.
The advice would therefore be to flash the GPUs and then install the AMD drivers. Let's say it would be because you may run into another problem this time related to the GPUs themselves. Since each video card is different from any other, the bios mod of the GPU could crash the operating system showing the classic blue screen and displaying an error related to the Atimkdag.sys file.

This could be due to the fact that some GPUs have significantly higher performance in the calculation phase than others. We could call it a factory overclock but not using them for gaming we cannot say it with absolute certainty.

Having assessed these two drawbacks, the only safe solution is to flash all the GPUs, disconnect them except for the first one, install the Blockchain drivers (plus Atimkdag patch) and launch the mining command verifying that the operating system does not go into crash in the next 5 minutes.

Turn off the rig again and connect the second GPU so on up to the sixth. In the event that one or more video cards should crash the system, disconnect them. After that, it uses DDU from the provisional mode and flashes these GPUs with their original bios. At this point, connect them again, reinstall the Blockcain drivers (plus Atimkdag patch) and start mining definitively.

All the operations related to the use of Atiflash, DDU and driver installation are reported in Part 5 and Part 6 of our guide.
A little bit of Overclocking.
You will certainly find significant differences in performance between the GPUs.

At this point all that remains is to "operate" with an overclocking software. We opt for OverdriveNtool. Our constantly updated guide is available at the following link: https://www.cryptoall.it/2019/10/12/complete-guide-to-overdriventool/

Link to the official YouTube channel for verification: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdE9TTHAOtyKxy59rALSprA

GPUs with modified bios will not leave much room for modification. You will have to proceed with the most extreme overclocking on those that mount the original bios; obviously always in small steps by saving the profile for each GPU. Our guide explains in detail how to do it.

Hoping to have been of help, we give everyone an appointment for the second part of the update on how to build an Ethereum mining rig in which we will explain in detail the dual mining on the Ethermine pool.

See you soon.


If you liked this article and would like to contribute with a donation:

Bitcoin: 1Ld9b165ZYHZcY9eUQmL9UjwzcphRE5S8Z
Ethereum: 0x8D7E456A11f4D9bB9e6683A5ac52e7DB79DBbEE7
Litecoin: LamSRc1jmwgx5xwDgzZNoXYd6ENczUZViK
Stellar: GBLDIRIQWRZCN5IXPIKYFQOE46OG2SI7AFVWFSLAHK52MVYDGVJ6IXGI
Ripple: rUb8v4wbGWYrtXzUpj7TxCFfUWgfvym9xf

By: cryptoall.it Telegram Channel: t.me/giulo75 Netbox Browser: https://netbox.global/PZn5A
submitted by Giulo75 to u/Giulo75 [link] [comments]

Make your own stakebox. Ultimate beginners guide how to compile any wallet on AARCH64 (Raspbery pi and other SBC)

I contemplated to wrote this for a long time, so it's finally time.
As you know a lot of altcoins uses PoS (Proof-of-stake) way of "mining" coins. Which basically means, that you hold coins on your unlocked wallet and you are receiving stakes as a reward. This requires very little power and it can bring you a lot of rewards, at just 10W from the wall.
So first I am using latest Raspbian on RPI4B 4GB in this example.Setting up Raspbian is not part of this process since it's very well documented. I recommend to change user from pi to something else due to security concerns and you can also do other stuff just search "security Raspberry PI" and you find a lot of articles, but this is not the focus of this guide.
I know there are a lot of guides on the internet, but I am using like 5 sources, so it's compiled what other people wrote and some of my research.
I am using AnyDesk insted of SSH or VNC server, because it works it's ligthweit and it just works.
So after you see the gui of Raspbian, just launch terminal (CTRL + ALT + T) and do basic thing:
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade
Than press Y and let it run, after is finished, we need to prepare so dependency packages. Since most of the wallets using Berkeley DB 4.8 we need to obtain it.
So in terminal wrote:
cd cd Downloads wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz tar -xzvf db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz cd db-4.8.30.NC/build_unix ../dist/configure --enable-cxx make sudo make install 
So wait unti it's finished and than you can delete files in Downloads folder in gui or use:
sudo rm -r [folder] 
So next thing we need to install some libraries.
sudo apt-get install git build-essential libtool autotools-dev autoconf pkg-config libssl-dev libcrypto++-dev libevent-dev libminiupnpc-dev libgmp-dev libboost-all-dev devscripts libdb++-dev libsodium-dev 
And pres y and let it run. After that another set of libraries:
sudo apt-get install libqt5gui5 libqt5core5a libqt5dbus5 qttools5-dev qttools5-dev-tools libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler libcrypto++- dev libminiupnpc-dev qt5-default 
And then again pres y and let it run. Some wallets need older version of libssl1.0-dev, so for for safe compiling we install that as well:
sudo apt-get install libssl1.0-dev 
Pres y and let it run. Warning don't use sudo-apt get autoremove, since it would wipe this package, since it's old.
Next thing we are going to obtain Bitcoin PPA filest, which can be done like this.
cd /etc/apt/sources.list.d/ sudo nano bitcoin.list 
Paste this in there:
deb-src http://ppa.launchpad.net/bitcoin/bitcoin/ubuntu artful main 
And CTRL+X and than y, then do this:
sudo apt-key adv --keyserver hkp://keyserver.ubuntu.com:80 --recv C70EF1F0305A1ADB9986DBD8D46F45428842CE5E sudo apt-get update 
So now we are ready for compiling. So we are going create folders. CD yourself where this folder should be situated, if you for example have plugged in some external drive. Then:
mkdir Crypto cd Crypto 
And then we have to choose wallet which you want to compile. I am choosing Streamies (STRMS) as an example, since it's pretty good coin for staking. So:
mkdir Streamies cd Streamies 
Then go to the github page and click on the green button on the left and click copy to clipboard, which gives you git link.
git clone https://github.com/Streamies/Streamies.git 
Watch the output folder which it creates, it's stated in the first two lines and copy then by highliting the text and CTRL+SHIFT+C copy it to your clipboard.
cd Streamies (this is that git created folder) ./autogen.sh ./configure CPPFLAGS="-I/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/include -O2" LDFLAGS="-L/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/lib" sudo make (this could take hours) sudo make install 
And you are done, files is going to be in folder /uslocal/bin (DO NOT delete git created folder, because you are going to need it for faster compiling, when wallet get's and update.)
cd /uslocal/bin 
Now you can list files by:
ls 
And then you can copy/move them where ever you want by using:
sudo mv * [destination full path] 
Let it run and go back to folder where you move those files.
sudo chmod +x streamies-qt (since we want to run wallet) 
In most cases compiled files are going to in format of "shared library" so we need to create script to run it. Open up a text editor from gui or through nano. And paste this to that file:
#!/bin/bash ./streamies-qt 
And save it as a sh file, for example run.sh. Then we need to make it runnable so:
sudo chmod +x run.sh 
Now to run it, it's just:
./run.sh 
And here we are glorious GUI wallet appears and you are done, you can paste blockchain, wallet.dat from other sources, so this migration is pretty easy and you, if you have it on for exaple flash disk.
So this is basic how to compile QT wallets on AARCH64. I am running 7 wallets, 2 of those are Masternodes and RPI 4B 4GB would handle way more, I am at best on half of my RAM.
Some wallets need more package, but it's not much of and issue, since compiling stops and you just copy paste nape which is missing put it in the google and add "apt-get" after the name of package and you are going to see, what is the name of the packages so it can be retreived from package assinstant aka apt-get. So basically:
sudo apt-get install [package name] 
Then press y and again wrote:
sudo make 
This process is going to continue where it was left off, so nothing is going to run from beginning.
Updating wallets is basically exactly same, just repeat steps from "git clone" and after that proceed as it was written above.
So I hope this helps some of you, to use this at home and not on some VPS, if you are anxious as me, to host my wallets on remote server.
submitted by M1chlCZ to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

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