Massive Bitcoin-Betrugswelle überrollt Twitter heise online

The Dusk Network

The Dusk Network is a privacy-oriented blockchain protocol, that anyone can use to create zero-knowledge dApps. By allowing Dusk to be openly accessible, Dusk Network aims to become the privacy infrastructure of choice for an entire ecosystem of solutions.
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radio reddit: Where the listeners are in control

/radioreddit is the subreddit for the radio reddit online streaming radio station featuring 100% original music created by thousands of redditors. The live streams are algorithmic and controlled 100% by listener votes. Tune in now at http://radioreddit.com/listen You can upload your original music for airplay at http://www.radioreddit.com/uploading For Talk radio reddit, visit /talkradioreddit.
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Monero: the secure, private, untraceable currency

This is the official subreddit of Monero (XMR), a secure, private, untraceable currency that is open-source and freely available to all.
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EFF Newsletter: Rising Costs of Explaining Bitcoin; Twitter's Plan to Fight Trolls; FBI Seeks Better Euphemisms...

EFF Newsletter: Rising Costs of Explaining Bitcoin; Twitter's Plan to Fight Trolls; FBI Seeks Better Euphemisms... submitted by dspeyer to aprilfools [link] [comments]

MicroStrategy's $425M BTC investment thesis - "buy something that can either get cut in half or 10x"

Amidst all of the DeFi volatility, drama and excitement, Bitcoin has started to seem rather boring. Its price is more or less flat to where it was a year ago and you can’t even farm Yams with it.
While some have started to view Bitcoin as a useless digital rock, someone did find an interesting use case for it. This week, more details surfaced around how MicroStrategy CEO Michael Saylor convinced the board of a publicly traded company to allocate nearly all of the company’s $500M cash position to bitcoin.
Michael Saylor
Saylor graduated from MIT in 1987 and founded Microstrategy at the age of 24. MicroStrategy is a “Business Intelligence” company, which basically creates software that allows companies to use their own data to drive decision making.
Interesting side note - Saylor, like any good 90’s internet entrepreneur, also bought a bunch of internet domains and was the guy who ultimately sold Voice.com to Block.One (EOS) for $30M.
MicroStrategy’s’ $500M Problem
To most people, having $500 million in cash doesn’t sound like a problem. Up until recently, it wasn’t for large corporations either. There was a time before the ‘08 financial crisis when the risk free rate of return on cash was 5% a year. This means a company could sit on $500M, earn $25M a year for doing nothing, and have cash on hand for a rainy day.
Fast forward to today, when the risk free rate of return has plummeted to 0.69% due to loose fiscal policies (money printer go BRRRR) alongside inflating asset prices, and it’s a different story. In Saylor’s own words, “we just had the awful realization that we were sitting on top of a $500 million ice cube that’s melting.”
Cash is Trash
So what’s a corporation to do with a $500M melting ice cube? It turns out it’s not that easy to unload half a billion dollars in a short amount of time.
You could buy back half a billion of your own company’s shares. For a company like MSTR, Saylor estimated that would take 4 years. Time MiscroStrategy didn’t have.
You could buy real estate. However, commercial real estate prices have collapsed post COVID while property owners still believe their assets are worth what they were in January. In other words, good luck getting a fair market price.
You could buy blue chip equities. Amazon, Apple, Google, Facebook. However, your risk is symmetric. They can each fall 50% just as easily as they can go up 50%.
That left Saylor with silver, gold, Bitcoin, and other alternative assets. A move the company announced it was exploring on a July earnings call.
A Bold Purchase
Saylor ultimately wanted something that could either get cut in half, or go up by a factor of 10. An investment akin to what buying Amazon or Apple in 2012 was. In other words, asymmetric risk.
As a student of technological history, Saylor observed that the winning strategy over the last ten years has been to find some kind of “digitally dominant network” that dematerializes something fundamental to society. Apple dematerialized mobile communications. Amazon dematerialized commerce. Google dematerialized the process of gathering information.
Something Saylor noted was common to all recent 10X opportunities is buying when they’ve achieved $100B+ marketcaps and are ten times the size of their next biggest competitor. As Bitcoin is the dominant digital network dematerializing money that’s 10x the size of any cryptocurrency competing to be a store-of-value (not counting ETH here), it fit the bill.
Making the purchase
With the thesis in place, the next thing Saylor had to do was get everyone at MicroStrategy to sign-off on the unorthodox decision. To do this, he simply made everyone go down the same Bitcoin rabbithole that most people in the industry have gone down.
He made everyone at the company watch Andreas Antonopoulous videos, read The Bitcoin Standard, watch Eric Vorhees debate Peter Schiff and listen to Pomp and NLW podcasts. With no strong detractors, MicroStrategy turned to execution. They first put $250M to work purchasing 21,454 BTC in August and another $175M (16,796 BTC) in September for a total $425M and 38,250 BTC.
What’s fascinating is that MicroStrategy was able to open such a large position without really moving the market or anyone even taking notice. This speaks to just how liquid of an asset BTC has become. To acquire the September tranche of BTC, Saylor disclosed that they traded continuously for 74 hours, executing 88,617 trades of .19 BTC every 3 seconds.
One for the history books
Skeptics noted that shares of MSTR have been on the downtrend since 2013, as the real reason behind MicroStrategy’s bold move. Regardless, the move has interesting implications for the company’s shareholders. As TBI observed, MicroStrategy is now both a software company and with ⅓ of its marketcap in Bitcoin, a pseudo Bitcoin ETF. At the time of writing, MSTR is up 20% on the week.
Only time will tell if history looks back on this move as a brilliant strategic decision or a massive corporate blunder. In the short term, it scores a massive win for Bitcoin’s digital gold investment thesis.
Billionaire hedge fund manager Paul Tudor Jones is in. A publicly traded corporation has made Bitcoin it’s primary treasury asset. As CFOs and fund managers around the world undoubtedly take notice, one has to wonder, who’s next?
PS - I based a lot of this article on Pomp’s interview with Michael Saylor, which I recommend giving a listen.
Original article
Source
submitted by CryptigoVespucci to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

DITO rockets up 20%, drops 30%, then finishes flat... the Aristocrats! (Wednesday, Oct 7)

Happy Wednesday, Barkada --

The PSE closed down 28 points to 5911 ▼0.5%.

Good news! I have a couple of people who are potentially interested in sponsoring MB, so I'm excited to explore those opportunities. My goal has always been to simply be revenue neutral, and to keep MB free for everyone to enjoy. (inb4 "RAID Shadow Legends" ad)
Shout-out to Christine for her suggestion to try and improve the bottom-line of MB by moving from Mailchimp to SendFox. It's something I'm going to look into, but I'm very careful about making changes. I'll have to investigate. Thanks also to Jack_ol_lantern for suggesting ways to leverage my domain to try a "roll your own" alternative, and to nikohd for suggesting I offer a bitcoin donation address.
I've got lots to study this weekend! No complaints here, though. Exciting times in MB town.

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COVID Update

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Top 3 MB indices:

 Logistics ▲2.23% POGO Gaming ▲0.46% 2019 IPOs ▲0.35% 

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Main stories covered:

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Discovery World gets a lifeline from its chairman... shareholders get diluted (Friday, Oct 23)

Happy Friday, Barkada --

The PSE closed up 66 points to 6345 ▲1.1%.

The PSE has had a nice little 7.5% run the past 5 trading days, let's see how the week closes out. Remember, Converge IPO is on Tuesday!
Shout-out to all the bitcoin hodlers out there. The recent run-up in price (up over US$13k today) must feel nice after Paypal announced it would incorporate crypto transactions into its payment platform (after being anti-crypto for a very very long time).
Happy weekend!

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COVID Update

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Top 3 MB indices:

 POGO Prop. ▲3.02% #COVID-19 ▲2.80% Power Gen. ▲2.47% 

Bottom 3 MB indices:

 2019 IPOs ▼2.18% MiddleClass ▼1.04% POGO Gaming ▼0.99% 

Main stories covered:

MB is posted to /PHinvest every Monday and Wednesday, but my newsletter goes out daily. To stay in the loop for daily email delivery, please join the barkada by signing up for the newsletter, or follow me on Twitter.

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/r/Scams Common Scam Master Post

Hello visitors and subscribers of scams! Here you will find a master list of common (and uncommon) scams that you may encounter online or in real life. Thank you to the many contributors who helped create this thread!

If you know of a scam that is not covered here, write a comment and it will be added to the next edition.

Previous threads: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/search?q=common+scams+master+post&restrict_sr=on
Blackmail email scam thread: https://www.reddit.com/Scams/comments/jij7zf/the_blackmail_email_scam_part_6/
Some of these articles are from small, local publications and refer to the scam happening in a specific area. Do not think that this means that the scam won't happen in your area.

Spoofing

Caller ID spoofing
It is very easy for anyone to make a phone call while having any number show up on the caller ID of the person receiving the phone call. Receiving a phone call from a certain number does not mean that the person/company who owns that number has actually called you.
Email spoofing
The "from" field of an email can be set by the sender, meaning that you can receive scam emails that look like they are from legitimate addresses. It's important to never click links in emails unless absolutely necessary, for example a password reset link you requested or an account activation link for an account you created.
SMS spoofing
SMS messages can be spoofed, so be wary of messages that seem to be from your friends or other trusted people.

The most common scams

The fake check scam (Credit to nimble2 for this part)
The fake check scam arises from many different situations (for instance, you applied for a job, or you are selling something on a place like Craigslist, or someone wants to purchase goods or services from your business, or you were offered a job as a mystery shopper, you were asked to wrap your car with an advertisement, or you received a check in the mail for no reason), but the bottom line is always something like this:
General fraudulent funds scams If somebody is asking you to accept and send out money as a favour or as part of a job, it is a fraudulent funds scam. It does not matter how they pay you, any payment on any service can be fraudulent and will be reversed when it is discovered to be fraudulent.
Phone verification code scams Someone will ask you to receive a verification text and then tell you to give them the code. Usually the code will come from Google Voice, or from Craigslist. In the Google version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Google Voice account that the scammer will use to scam people with. In the Craigslist version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Craigslist posting that the scammer will use to scam people. There is also an account takeover version of this scam that will involve the scammer sending a password reset token to your phone number and asking you for it.
Bitcoin job scams
Bitcoin job scams involve some sort of fraudulent funds transfer, usually a fake check although a fraudulent bank transfer can be used as well. The scammer will send you the fraudulent money and ask you to purchase bitcoins. This is a scam, and you will have zero recourse after you send the scammer bitcoins.
Email flooding
If you suddenly receive hundreds or thousands of spam emails, usually subscription confirmations, it's very likely that one of your online accounts has been taken over and is being used fraudulently. You should check any of your accounts that has a credit card linked to it, preferably from a computer other than the one you normally use. You should change all of your passwords to unique passwords and you should start using two factor authentication everywhere.
Cartel scam
You will be threatened by scammers who claim to be affiliated with a cartel. They may send you gory pictures and threaten your life and the lives of your family. Usually the victim will have attempted to contact an escort prior to the scam, but sometimes the scammers target people randomly. If you are targeted by a cartel scam all you need to do is ignore the scammers as their threats are clearly empty.
Boss/CEO scam A scammer will impersonate your boss or someone who works at your company and will ask you to run an errand for them, which will usually be purchasing gift cards and sending them the code. Once the scammer has the code, you have no recourse.
Employment certification scams
You will receive a job offer that is dependent on you completing a course or receiving a certification from a company the scammer tells you about. The scammer operates both websites and the job does not exist.
Craigslist fake payment scams
Scammers will ask you about your item that you have listed for sale on a site like Craigslist, and will ask to pay you via Paypal. They are scamming you, and the payment in most cases does not actually exist, the email you received was sent by the scammers. In cases where you have received a payment, the scammer can dispute the payment or the payment may be entirely fraudulent. The scammer will then either try to get you to send money to them using the fake funds that they did not send to you, or will ask you to ship the item, usually to a re-shipping facility or a parcel mule.
Craigslist Carfax/vehicle history scam
You'll encounter a scammer on Craigslist who wants to buy the vehicle you have listed, but they will ask for a VIN report from a random site that they have created and they will expect you to pay for it.
Double dip/recovery scammers
This is a scam aimed at people who have already fallen for a scam previously. Scammers will reach out to the victim and claim to be able to help the victim recover funds they lost in the scam.
General fraudulent funds scams The fake check scam is not the only scam that involves accepting fraudulent/fake funds and purchasing items for scammers. If your job or opportunity involves accepting money and then using that money, it is almost certainly a frauduent funds scam. Even if the payment is through a bank transfer, Paypal, Venmo, Zelle, Interac e-Transfer, etc, it does not matter.
Credit card debt scam
Fraudsters will offer to pay off your bills, and will do so with fraudulent funds. Sometimes it will be your credit card bill, but it can be any bill that can be paid online. Once they pay it off, they will ask you to send them money or purchase items for them. The fraudulent transaction will be reversed in the future and you will never be able to keep the money. This scam happens on sites like Craigslist, Twitter, Instagram, and also some dating sites, including SeekingArrangement.
The parcel mule scam
A scammer will contact you with a job opportunity that involves accepting and reshipping packages. The packages are either stolen or fraudulently obtained items, and you will not be paid by the scammer. Here is a news article about a scam victim who fell for this scam and reshipped over 20 packages containing fraudulently acquired goods.
The Skype sex scam
You're on Facebook and you get a friend request from a cute girl you've never met. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. She'll ask you to send pictures or videos or get on webcam where she can see you naked with your face in the picture. The scam: There's no girl. You've sent nudes to a guy pretending to be a girl. As soon as he has the pictures he'll demand money and threaten to send the pictures to your friends and family. Sometimes the scammer will upload the video to a porn site or Youtube to show that they are serious.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: You cannot buy silence, you can only rent it. Paying the blackmailer will show them that the information they have is valuable and they will come after you for more money. Let your friends and family know that you were scammed and tell them to ignore friend requests or messages from people they don't know. Also, make sure your privacy settings are locked down and consider deactivating your account.
The underage girl scam
You're on a dating site or app and you get contacted by a cute girl. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. Eventually she stops communicating and you get a call from a pissed off guy claiming to be the girl's father, or a police officer, or a private investigator, or something else along those lines. Turns out the girl you were sexting is underage, and her parents want some money for various reasons, such as to pay for a new phone, to pay for therapy, etc. There is, of course, no girl. You were communicating with a scammer.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: Stop picking up the phone when the scammers call. Do not pay them, or they will be after you for more money.
Phishing
Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick you into giving information to them, such as your password or private financial information. Phishing messages will usually look very similar to official messages, and sometimes they are identical. If you are ever required to login to a different account in order to use a service, you should be incredibly cautious.
The blackmail email scam part 5: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/g8jqnthe_blackmail_email_scam_part_5/
PSA: you did not win a giftcard: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/fffmle/psa_you_did_not_win_a_gift_card/
Sugar scams
Sugar scammers operate all over the internet and usually come in two varieties: advance-fee scams where the scammer will ask for a payment from you before sending you lots of money, and fake check style scams where the scammer will either pull a classic fake check scam, or will do a "bill pay" style scam that involves them paying your bills, or them giving you banking information to pay your bills. If you encounter these scammers, report their accounts and move on.
Google Hangouts
Google Hangouts is a messaging platform used extensively by all kinds of scammers. If you are talking with someone online and they want you to switch to Hangouts, they are likely a scammer and you should proceed with caution.
Publishers Clearing House scams
PCH scams are often advance-fee scams, where you will be promised lots of money after you make an initial payment. You will never need to pay if you win money from the real PCH.
Pet scams
You are looking for a specific breed of puppy, bird, or other pet. You come across a nice-looking website that claims to be breeding them and has some available right now - they may even be on sale! The breeders are not local to your area (and may not even list a physical location) but they assure you they can safely ship the pet to you after a deposit or full payment. If you go through with the payment, you will likely be contacted by the "shipper" who will inform you about an unexpected shipping/customs/processing fee required to deliver your new pet. But there was never any pet, both the "breeder" and the "shipper" are scammers, typically operating out of Africa. These sites are rampant and account for a large percentage of online pet seller websites - they typically have a similar layout/template (screenshot - example)
If you are considering buying a pet online, some easy things to check are: (1) The registration date of the domain (if it was created recently it is likely a scam website) (2) Reverse image search the pictures of available pets - you will usually find other scam websites using the same photos. (3) Copy a sentence/section of the text from the "about us" page and put it into google (in quotes) - these scammers often copy large parts of their website's text from other places. (4) Search for the domain name and look for entries on petscams.com or other scam-tracking sites. (5) Strongly consider buying/adopting your pet from a local shelter or breeder where you can see the animal in person before putting any money down.
Thanks to djscsi for this entry.
Fake shipping company scams
These scams usually start when you try to buy something illegal online. You will be scammed for the initial payment, and then you will receive an email from the fake shipping company telling you that you need to pay them some sort of fee or bribe. If you pay this, they will keep trying to scam you with increasingly absurd stories until you stop paying, at which point they will blackmail you. If you are involved in this scam, all you can do is ignore the scammers and move on, and try to dispute your payments if possible.
Chinese Upwork scam
Someone will ask you to create an Upwork or other freelancer site account for them and will offer money in return. You will not be paid, and they want to use the accounts to scam people.
Quickbooks invoice scam
This is a fake check style scam that takes advantage of Quickbooks.
The blackmail email scam The exact wording of the emails varies, but there are generally four main parts. They claim to have placed software/malware on a porn/adult video site, they claim to have a video of you masturbating or watching porn, they threaten to release the video to your friends/family/loved ones/boss/dog, and they demand that you pay them in order for them to delete the video. Rest assured that this is a very common spam campaign and there is no truth behind the email or the threats. Here are some news articles about this scam.
The blackmail mail scam
This is very similar to the blackmail email scam, but you will receive a letter in the mail.
Rental scams Usually on local sites like Craigslist, scammers will steal photos from legitimate real estate listings and will list them for rent at or below market rate. They will generally be hesitant to tell you the address of the property for "safety reasons" and you will not be able to see the unit. They will then ask you to pay them a deposit and they claim they will ship you the keys. In reality, your money is gone and you will have no recourse.
Craigslist vehicle scams A scammer will list a vehicle on Craigslist and will offer to ship you the car. In many cases they will also falsely claim to sell you the car through eBay or Amazon. If you are looking for a car on Craigslist and the seller says anything about shipping the car, having an agent, gives you a long story about why they are selling the car, or the listing price is far too low, you are talking to a scammer and you should ignore and move on.
Advance-fee scam, also known as the 419 scam, or the Nigerian prince scam. You will receive a communication from someone who claims that you are entitled to a large sum of money, or you can help them obtain a large sum of money. However, they will need money from you before you receive the large sum.
Man in the middle scams
Man in the middle scams are very common and very hard to detect. The scammer will impersonate a company or person you are legitimately doing business with, and they will ask you to send the money to one of their own bank accounts or one controlled by a money mule. They have gained access to the legitimate persons email address, so there will be nothing suspicious about the email. To prevent this, make contact in a different way that lets you verify that the person you are talking to is the person you think you are talking to.
Digit wallet scam
A variation of the fake check scam, the scammer sends you money through a digital wallet (i.e. Venmo, Apple Pay, Zelle, Cash App) along with a message claiming they've sent the money to the wrong person and a request to send the money back. Customer service for these digital wallets may even suggest that you send the money back. However, the money sent is from a stolen credit card and will be removed from your account after a few days. Your transfer is not reversed since it came from your own funds.
Cam girl voting/viewer scam
You will encounter a "cam girl" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to go to their site and sign up with your credit card. They may offer a free show, or ask you to vote for them, or any number of other fake stories.
Amateur porn recruitment scam
You will encounter a "pornstar" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to create an adult film with hehim, but first you need to do something. The story here is usually something to do with verifying your age, or you needing to take an STD test that involves sending money to a site operated by the scammer.
Hot girl SMS spam
You receive a text from a random number with a message along the lines of "Hey babe I'm here in town again if you wanted to meet up this time, are you around?" accompanied by a NSFW picture of a hot girl. It's spam, and they'll direct you to their scam website that requires a credit card.
Identity verification scam
You will encounter someone on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask that you verify your identity as they are worried about catfishing. The scammer operates the site, and you are not talking to whoever you think you are talking to.
This type of scam teases you with something, then tries to make you sign up for something else that costs money. The company involved is often innocent, but they turn a blind eye to the practice as it helps their bottom line, even if they have to occasionally issue refunds. A common variation takes place on dating sites/dating apps, where you will match with someone who claims to be a camgirl who wants you to sign up for a site and vote for her. Another variation takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where the scammers setup fake rental scams and demand that you go through a specific service for a credit check. Once you go through with it, the scammer will stop talking to you. Another variation also takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where scammers will contact you while you are selling a car and will ask you to purchase a Carfax-like report from a specific website.
Multi Level Marketing or Affiliate Marketing
You apply for a vague job listing for 'sales' on craigslist. Or maybe an old friend from high school adds you on Facebook and says they have an amazing business opportunity for you. Or maybe the well dressed guy who's always interviewing people in the Starbucks that you work at asks if you really want to be slinging coffee the rest of your life. The scam: MLMs are little more than pyramid schemes. They involve buying some sort of product (usually snake oil health products like body wraps or supplements) and shilling them to your friends and family. They claim that the really money is recruiting people underneath you who give you a slice of whatever they sell. And if those people underneath you recruit more people, you get a piece of their sales. Ideally if you big enough pyramid underneath you the money will roll in without any work on your part. Failure to see any profit will be your fault for not "wanting it enough." The companies will claim that you need to buy their extra training modules or webinars to really start selling. But in reality, the vast majority of people who buy into a MLM won't see a cent. At the end of the day all you'll be doing is annoying your friends and family with your constant recruitment efforts. What to look out for: Recruiters love to be vague. They won't tell you the name of the company or what exactly the job will entail. They'll pump you up with promises of "self-generating income", "being your own boss", and "owning your own company." They might ask you to read books about success and entrepreneurs. They're hoping you buy into the dream first. If you get approached via social media, check their timelines. MLMs will often instruct their victims to pretend that they've already made it. They'll constantly post about how they're hustling and making the big bucks and linking to youtube videos about success. Again, all very vague about what their job actually entails. If you think you're being recruited: Ask them what exactly the job is. If they can't answer its probably a MLM. Just walk away.

Phone scams

You should generally avoid answering or engaging with random phone calls. Picking up and engaging with a scam call tells the scammers that your phone number is active, and will usually lead to more calls.
Tax Call
You get a call from somebody claiming to be from your countries tax agency. They say you have unpaid taxes that need to be paid immediately, and you may be arrested or have other legal action taken against you if it is not paid. This scam has caused the American IRS, Canadian CRA, British HMRC, and Australian Tax Office to issue warnings. This scam happens in a wide variety of countries all over the world.
Warrant Call
Very similar to the tax call. You'll get a phone call from an "agent", "officer", "sheriff", or other law enforcement officer claiming that there is a warrant out for your arrest and you will be arrested very soon. They will then offer to settle everything for a fee, usually paid in giftcards.
[Legal Documents/Process Server Calls]
Very similar to the warrant call. You'll get a phone call from a scammer claiming that they are going to serve you legal documents, and they will threaten you with legal consequences if you refuse to comply. They may call themselves "investigators", and will sometimes give you a fake case number.
Student Loan Forgiveness Scam
Scammers will call you and tell you about a student loan forgiveness program, but they are interested in obtaining private information about you or demanding money in order to join the fake program.
Tech Support Call You receive a call from someone with a heavy accent claiming to be a technician Microsoft or your ISP. They inform you that your PC has a virus and your online banking and other accounts may be compromised if the virus is not removed. They'll have you type in commands and view diagnostics on your PC which shows proof of the virus. Then they'll have you install remote support software so the technician can work on your PC, remove the virus, and install security software. The cost of the labor and software can be hundreds of dollars. The scam: There's no virus. The technician isn't a technician and does not work for Microsoft or your ISP. Scammers (primarily out of India) use autodialers to cold-call everyone in the US. Any file they point out to you or command they have you run is completely benign. The software they sell you is either freeware or ineffective. What to do you if you're involved with this scam: If the scammers are remotely on your computer as you read this, turn off your PC or laptop via the power button immediately, and then if possible unplug your internet connection. Some of the more vindictive tech scammers have been known to create boot passwords on your computer if they think you've become wise to them and aren't going to pay up. Hang up on the scammers, block the number, and ignore any threats about payment. Performing a system restore on your PC is usually all that is required to remove the scammer's common remote access software. Reports of identity theft from fake tech calls are uncommon, but it would still be a good idea to change your passwords for online banking and monitor your accounts for any possible fraud. How to avoid: Ignore any calls claiming that your PC has a virus. Microsoft will never contact you. If you're unsure if a call claiming to be from your ISP is legit, hang up, and then dial the customer support number listed on a recent bill. If you have elderly relatives or family that isn't tech savvy, take the time to fill them in on this scam.
Chinese government scam
This scam is aimed at Chinese people living in Europe and North America, and involves a voicemail from someone claiming to be associated with the Chinese government, usually through the Chinese consulate/embassy, who is threatening legal action or making general threats.
Chinese shipping scam
This scam is similar to the Chinese government scam, but involves a seized/suspicious package, and the scammers will connect the victim to other scammers posing as Chinese government investigators.
Social security suspension scam
You will receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government regarding suspicious activity, fraud, or serious crimes connected to your social security number. You'll be asked to speak to an operator and the operator will explain the steps you need to follow in order to fix the problems. It's all a scam, and will lead to you losing money and could lead to identity theft if you give them private financial information.
Utilities cutoff
You get a call from someone who claims that they are from your utility company, and they claim that your utilities will be shut off unless you immediately pay. The scammer will usually ask for payment via gift cards, although they may ask for payment in other ways, such as Western Union or bitcoin.
Relative in custody Scammer claims to be the police, and they have your son/daughtenephew/estranged twin in custody. You need to post bail (for some reason in iTunes gift cards or MoneyGram) immediately or the consequences will never be the same.
Mexican family scam
This scam comes in many different flavours, but always involves someone in your family and Mexico. Sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been detained, sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been kidnapped, and sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member is injured and needs help.
General family scams
Scammers will gather a large amount of information about you and target your family members using different stories with the goal of gettimg them to send money.
One ring scam
Scammers will call you from an international number with the goal of getting you to return their call, causing you to incur expensive calling fees.

Online shopping scams

THE GOLDEN RULE OF ONLINE SHOPPING: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Dropshipping
An ad on reddit or social media sites like Facebook and Instagram offers items at huge discounts or even free (sometimes requiring you to reblog or like their page). They just ask you to pay shipping. The scam: The item will turn out to be very low quality and will take weeks or even months to arrive. Sometimes the item never arrives, and the store disappears or stops responding. The seller drop-ships the item from China. The item may only cost a few dollars, and the Chinese government actually pays for the shipping. You end up paying $10-$15 dollars for a $4 item, with the scammer keeping the profit. If you find one of these scams but really have your heart set on the item, you can find it on AliExpress or another Chinese retailer.
Influencer scams
A user will reach out to you on a social media platform, usually Instagram, and offer you the chance to partner with them and receive a free/discounted product, as long as you pay shipping. This is a different version of the dropshipping scam, and is just a marketing technique to get you to buy their products.
Triangulation fraud
Triangulation fraud occurs when you make a purchase on a site like Amazon or eBay for an item at a lower than market price, and receive an item that was clearly purchased new at full price. The scammer uses a stolen credit card to order your item, while the money from the listing is almost all profit for the scammer.
Instagram influencer scams
Someone will message you on Instagram asking you to promote their products, and offering you a discount code. The items are Chinese junk, and the offer is made to many people at a time.
Cheap Items
Many websites pop up and offer expensive products, including electronics, clothes, watches, sunglasses, and shoes at very low prices. The scam: Some sites are selling cheap knock-offs. Some will just take your money and run. What to do if you think you're involved with this scam: Contact your bank or credit card and dispute the charge. How to avoid: The sites often have every brand-name shoe or fashion item (Air Jordan, Yeezy, Gucci, etc) in stock and often at a discounted price. The site will claim to be an outlet for a major brand or even a specific line or item. The site will have images at the bottom claiming to be Secured by Norton or various official payment processors but not actual links. The site will have poor grammar and a mish-mash of categories. Recently, established websites will get hacked or their domain name jacked and turned into scam stores, meaning the domain name of the store will be completely unrelated to the items they're selling. If the deal sounds too good to be true it probably is. Nobody is offering brand new iPhones or Beats or Nintendo Switches for 75% off.
Cheap Amazon 3rd Party Items
You're on Amazon or maybe just Googling for an item and you see it for an unbelievable price from a third-party seller. You know Amazon has your back so you order it. The scam: One of three things usually happen: 1) The seller marks the items as shipped and sends a fake tracking number. Amazon releases the funds to the seller, and the seller disappears. Amazon ultimately refunds your money. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to re-order the item directly from their website, usually with the guarantee that the order is still protected by Amazon. The seller takes your money and runs. Amazon informs you that they do not offer protection on items sold outside of Amazon and cannot help you. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to instead send payment via an unused Amazon gift card by sending the code on the back via email. Once the seller uses the code, the money on the card is gone and cannot be refunded. How to avoid: These scammers can be identified by looking at their Amazon storefronts. They'll be brand new sellers offering a wide range of items at unbelievable prices. Usually their Amazon names will be gibberish, or a variation on FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME. Occasionally however, established storefronts will be hacked. If the deal is too good to be true its most likely a scam.
Scams on eBay
There are scams on eBay targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who privately message you regarding the order, especially if they ask you to ship to a different address or ask to negotiate via text/email/a messaging service. As a buyer you should look out for new accounts selling in-demand items, established accounts selling in-demand items that they have no previous connection to (you can check their feedback history for a general idea of what they bought/sold in the past), and lookout for people who ask you to go off eBay and use another service to complete the transaction. In many cases you will receive a fake tracking number and your money will be help up for up to a month.
Scams on Amazon
There are scams on Amazon targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who message you about a listing. As a buyer you should look out for listings that have an email address for you to contact the person to complete the transaction, and you should look out for cheap listings of in-demand items.
Scams on Reddit
Reddit accounts are frequently purchased and sold by fraudsters who wish to use the high karma count + the age of the account to scam people on buy/sell subreddits. You need to take precautions and be safe whenever you are making a transaction online.
Computer scams
Virus scam
A popup or other ad will say that you have a virus and you need to follow their advice in order to remove it. They are lying, and either want you to install malware or pay for their software.

Assorted scams

Chinese Brushing / direct shipping
If you have ever received an unsolicited small package from China, your address was used to brush. Vendors place fake orders for their own products and send out the orders so that they can increase their ratings.
Money flipping
Scammer claims to be a banking insider who can double/triple/bazoople any amount of money you send them, with no consequences of any kind. Obviously, the money disappears into their wallet the moment you send it.

General resources

Site to report scams in the United Kingdom: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
Site to report scams in the United States: https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
Site to report scams in Canada: www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm
Site to report scams in Europe: https://www.europol.europa.eu/report-a-crime/report-cybercrime-online
FTC scam alerts: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts
Microsoft's anti-scam guide: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds
https://www.usa.gov/scams-and-frauds
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts
https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes
submitted by EugeneBYMCMB to Scams [link] [comments]

The feasibility of using one email address per online presence with ProtonMail

In Bitcoin, the receive address reuse is a bad form for transaction privacy. Because as you use the same Bitcoin address, again and again, to send and receive bitcoins, an entity that's watching the transactions happening on chain can identify that address, cluster it, and make certain inferences that degrade the user's privacy.
Somewhat similar situation also exists in email usage -- certainly of today, if not 10 years ago.
Today, people use a single email to sign up to twitter, youtube, facebook, all other social media, forums, newsletters, online shopping, online comments boards, their governments' online services, and more.
Using that johndoe-at-example-dot-com email address over and over, on such a diverse breadth of services can degrade that user's privacy.
I am aware that some of the online services (newsletters, forums, bank account services, social media, etc.) aggregate user data, package them, and sell to advertising companies under auction.
So, as a user's data switches hands as a result of this (aggregated or non-aggregated) info-share between internet services, a person who looks purposefully (intel agencies, ad companies, etc.) can deduce the online presence over this pattern of repeating email addresses.
For example, John might be using his single email address for twitter, some forums and amazon. And let's say, only his amazon account is linked to his real identity. So, an entity (perhaps amazon itself) who can pull user email addresses from such diverse sources on the internet, can uncover John's real identity linked to his email address, and then his social media and/or forum posts to his real name.
So, the solution to this privacy degradation is using one email address per online service.
The question is: is this something feasible to do with protonmail?
I am aware that generating a single, unique email address at the user's whim can be used for spam, or abuse. But I believe also the privacy gains are huge.
Bitcoin wallets today generate a single and unique Bitcoin receive address for each new transaction.
So, can we also have protonmail (or some other email service) that generates a new email address per online service?
I know that facebook+john(-at-)pm.me, or forum+john(-at-)pm.me, etc. exist. However, by simple inspection, in these cases, it's possible to deduce the email account behind these two addresses is john(-at-)pm.me. So, this doesn't really solve the aforementioned problem.
What we need is totally randomized email addresses using random-phrase-generators (like Diceware passphrases) such as: randomhorse(-at-)pm.me, or coolstaple(-at-)pm.me.
Also, I am aware of the services like 33mail or AnonAddy. However, relying on an external, extra service for emails adds up to the compleity, to the attack-surface, to the overall hassle.
So, the question I would like to discuss is this: is this something feasible to do with protonmail?
submitted by Satoshi_Disciple to ProtonMail [link] [comments]

Weekly Privacy Newsletter 10/13/20

Weekly Privacy Newsletter 10/13/20
https://i.redd.it/zc1wpet5zvs51.gif
Interested in privacy for your Bitcoin and other crypto?
Check out this week's Privacy Newsletter for the latest news on how Incognito is reshaping privacy for DeFi: https://we.incognito.org/t/6684
submitted by incognitochain to IncognitoChain [link] [comments]

10-14 21:35 - '6 Things To Think About Before Investing In Cryptocurrencies Like Bitcoin' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/we-coach-crypto removed from /r/Bitcoin within 61-71min

'''
1. Is it affordable? This is an important thing to think about, don’t get caught in the hype of current prices. Only invest what you can afford to lose, re-mortgaging your house to invest is not a smart move!
2. Research the marketplace thoroughly If you don’t know anything about the project you are investing into or the market itself, you are creating more risk. Education is paramount, if you don’t know anything about the market, find someone that does.
3. Time Horizon Equally important to understand that once you invest, it may be some time before you can access your funds. Markets do not travel in a straight line, so some days you could be up and others you could be down. Timing is key, if you invest during a bear market you could be waiting a while to get your money back.
4. Pulling Profits You need to execute a plan for reaching goals, this should include targets that you monitor and act upon to pull regular profits during times where the market goes up. This will not only start to cover your initial investment but also help educate you on when to take action to ensure you have a good return on your investment.
5. Create an emergency fund for unforeseen circumstances There could not be a more uncertain time in people’s lives than right now. Jobs are at risk with lots of business closures as a result of Covid-19 and lockdown. We cannot look into the future but we can prepare for it. Try and get completely debt free and at least 3 months ahead for living expenses before choosing to invest. This gives you a cushion for some time if you lose your job and need to search for a new one.
6. Risk vs Reward The [cryptocurrency]1 market is extremely volatile, this means that the risk vs reward is extremely high. There are over 5500 [coins/tokens]2 you can choose to invest into. Some are established projects that are changing the world and could become the new major players in town further down the line. Many of them are not, history teaches us that sometimes a fantastic idea can also be destroyed in seconds by a slightly better idea. This happens a great deal in this market, without educating yourself and following industry news, you can easily get caught out and lose money. Research and understand the projects, look into the team behind them, their activity and engagement online, their whitepaper and see what partnerships they have.
If you have helpful advice to add, please feel free to comment. If you found these tips helpful and want more helpful tips on cryptocurrency, download our [free e-book Cryptocurrency Explained]3 . You can subscribe to our monthly newsletter packed with helpful tips on our website [[link]5 Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and Twitter using @wecoachcrypto
'''
6 Things To Think About Before Investing In Cryptocurrencies Like Bitcoin
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: we-coach-crypto
1: *n**ikipedia*org*wiki/Cryptocu*r***y 2: *n.*i*ipe*ia.or*/*i*i*L*st_of_c*yp**currencies 3: we*oachcrypto**om/*re*-**ok 4: *e*oa*hcr*pto.com/ 5: weco*ch*ry**o.*om]^^4
Unknown links are censored to prevent spreading illicit content.
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Century Pacific ups the Coco Wars ante against Axelum (Wednesday, August 20)

Happy Wednesday, Barkada --

The PSE closed up 88 points to 6157 ▲1.44%.

Thank you verneornitier for pat on the back, and to StefanJanobski for being a reader since before the lockdown. Remember those days? Back when it was possible to consider a packed restaurant or bar to be "great atmosphere"? That's how long they've been a reader! That seems like forever ago.
Thanks also to Bien for the nice email, and to Mark for his approval of my puns. My puns! Compliments like that are going to make my hair wet... you know, because my head will get tubig.

Daily meme | Join MB | Today's email

COVID Update

WW: 22043508 PH: 164377 

Top 3 MB indices:

 2020 IPOs ▲5.66% Logistics ▲1.85% POGO Gaming ▲1.80% 

Bottom 3 MB indices:

 MiddleClass ▼1.17% D30 Targets ▼0.12% Fast Food ▲0.02% 

Main stories covered:

MB is posted to /PHinvest every Monday and Wednesday, but my newsletter goes out daily. To stay in the loop for daily email delivery, please join the barkada by signing up for the newsletter, or follow me on Twitter.

Join our Barkada here

Read today's full email here

submitted by DuncnIdahosBandurria to phinvest [link] [comments]

The Tether Conspiracy

I am going to write a long article/rant against the Tether conspiracy. The reason is not that I have any vested interested, it’s not that I like the guys and secrecy of their project and it’s not that I don’t like transparency in general. But as with all conspiracy theories they need some sense of logic and I am here to provide this without insider knowledge. Just rational thinking as an investor.

What is Tether?

Tether is a *centralized* cryptocurrency run by the same people that run Bitfinex, one of the first and biggest exchanges. It’s ticker is USDT and you can find it in almost every cryptocurrency exchange. It has a price tied on the US Dollar but that is precisely the issue of the conspiracy theories. They claim that Tether is not actually tied to the dollar and that it’s value is used to prop up the value of Bitcoin. I will break down both arguments rationally.

Is it backed by USD?

First of all there is evidence form the long trial of NY attorney that is going on for ages. So let’s first understand something. Tether and Bitfinex is providing a worldwide service for cryptocurrency which is NOT legal tender in every country and has many rules and regulations. Therefore it’s totally unrealistic to think of it as a normal bank that needs to be super transparent to its shareholders. It provides a certain service to the cryptocurrency community that is supposed to not want to be traced. Now on the matter of if it is backed or not, this trial has revealed that it was indeed backed until a foreign government(s) froze part of their money supply in the order of 20% or so. After that they did a reverse ICO on Bitfinex and got the money supply they wanted. Now other reasons to debunk this theory if you are thinking straight:
  1. It is absolutely impossible for all the cryptocurrency exchanges that deal with millions of volume to not know if something is wrong and expose themselves to systemic risk like that. It is like saying that JP Morgan doesn’t know if their Gold suppliers are scammers or not. Yes they do if they are the same suppliers for all the big banks. And in the end, if they are scammers, anyone reading this article is in no way to tell and now more about the truth.
  2. Tether has had an audit (although not complete and controversial) that was done by a firm founded by US Federal Judges who would put their reputation in front if they were attesting to a scam. You can find the relevant article here.
  3. Tether has kept its price peg. That is extremely important because in the open market if I know that Tether is unbacked that means that I should short sell it because the price will drop. But the price hasn’t dropped. When FUD was abundant the Bitfinex guys were actually buying their reserves on discount! That is incredible because they made money on people speculating on their reserves that they knew (I suppose!) that were there.

Market Manipulation

First of all I will start by saying that nobody knows when the Bitcoin market is going up, down or sideways. There are too many variables and unknowns even to the higher echelons of Bitcoin hodlers (see whales). As an example a Japanese liquidator was selling en masse Bitcoins in 2018 in the open market without anybody knowing it. Also, bubbles get created by pure mania. Nobody needed Tether to pump in 2017, you could go in taxis and the cab driver would tell you to buy altcoins! Nevertheless there are at least 2 opposing studies done by universities where one finds that it was indeed the culprit and the other one finds that price was irrelevant and no wrong doing. You can chose your medicine here. The fundamental fact that newbies scream about in the forums and it’s absolutely driving crazy is this:
Tether is supposed to “print” more when exchanges ask for liquidity because of increased deposits.
It is extremely tiring to read every day on reddit that “Tether prints another 4 million USD” kid of posts that assume that this is money that is non-existent. No, that’s not how it works. On the opposite side, Tether also burns tokens, something that very few know, realize and understand. So the act of adding liquidity is obviously correlated to the price because liquidity increases when big market movements are coming. That doesn’t and can’t prove of manipulation. There was this famous Bitfinexed account on Twitter that went silent. A guy that was obsessed for years and years with Bitfinex.

Conclusion

I am not saying that Bitfinex and Tether are legit. I am saying that as an investor I need to take a critical look at what’s going on and stop hearing cassandras. Yes maybe they are scammers and maybe they will default. If this happens it means that most or *all* of the cryptocurrency exchanges knew and nobody said a thing. That means that you know better than the NY attorney that confirmed they were in possession of at least 80% of their reserves and the other ones were confiscated. To make things simple, your local bank doesn’t have 80% reserves today if needed. I hope I am correct because Tether could take down the price of Bitcoin a lot if it fails but it won’t be a death blow for sure. The are other stablecoins that are gaining traction (see GUSD,USDC,DAI).
P.S If you find value in what you are reading subscribe to the newsletter.
submitted by aelaos1 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Alpha5 Futures Swaps: Creating Value in Crypto Derivatives

Alpha5 Futures Swaps: Creating Value in Crypto Derivatives
Crypto derivatives have come some way in a short period of time, albeit the infrastructure of the ecosystem is still largely haphazard and uncoordinated.
Most exchanges experience a daily volume that equals or surpasses their Open Interest, highlighting some concern of trust, but more the lack of stickiness of capital.
(Source: Coingecko.com, Date: 10th July 2020)
And when it comes to actual trading, despite all the showboating, one product reigns king, the Perpetual Swap. In fact, roughly 2/3 of all BTC linear derivatives volume clears through this single product.
(Source: Coingecko.com, Date: 10th July 2020)
This is a problem. On one hand we speak of the evolving state of the market, but under the hood it appears, everyone is hugging familiarity. Without a developed futures curve, the ecosystem faces a lot of problems; speculators aren’t able to trade basis, lenders/borrowers must painstakingly hedge cash flows, convex products such as options are unable to be priced effectively, bond market development is delayed, and so on…
The large part of the issue however is not that these futures don’t exist (they do), but that they lack liquidity. But why would anyone want to venture out to the 9-month future of Bitcoin? Is the premium fair? Is it rich? Or is it too low? Almost every active HFT trader will prefer the perpetual swap to a far-dated future.
How is this solved? Futures Swaps (also known as “Futures Spreads”).
Futures swaps simply represent the price-differential between two different points in time of the same underlying contract.
For instance, assume the price of the September BTC future is 9,500, and the price of the December BTC future is 9,700. The fair market value of the Sep/Dec Futures swap is -200.
How are they used?

For “Rolling”

Assume a trader has bought (is long) 10,000 September BTC futures contracts expiring on 25th September. As the expiry date draws closer the trader wishes to “roll” their position to the next futures contract, the December BTC futures contract expiring on 25th December. If they didn’t, the trader would lose their long position, and simply realize pnL with the close-out price as the price of expiration of the September Future. To execute the roll, the trader needs to close his/her position by selling (going short) 10,000 September BTC futures contracts, and at the same time buying 10,000 December BTC futures contracts. In the absence of an effective swaps contract, he will do this manually. The execution of the roll carries two major risks:
  • Significant price risk: In an attempt to simultaneously and continuously sell/buy 10,000 futures, prices may move significantly, and the available amount in any single execution may be greater in one contract than the other; it can get lob-sided.
  • Increased fees: Unless the trader is algorithmically managing to try and become a Maker in both instances, he/she is likely to pay 2x the Taker fee in an attempt to quickly ensure the trade amounts are equal in both maturities.

For Basis Trades

It is not necessary that in the above example the trader necessarily have a position in either contract to begin with; a roll may not be mandatory. In fact, it is entirely possible that a price-differential of $200 is attractive on its own for a trader to try and earn ‘roll-down’. If the December contract is worth $200 more than the September contract in today’s date, what is the reason? Is it simply futures interest? Is it distorted by some other risks? In either event, a savvy trader may look to bet on the convergence (or even further divergence), and this would be enabled by that single-click trade in the Futures Swap market.

What does this do for the ecosystem?

Futures swaps/spreads are a common product in legacy markets. At their core, their very nature drives liquidity ‘further out the curve’. When you log into a dashboard and you see a Mar 2021 BTC futures contract, it may look as if it has a lot of risk. But what if you also saw a Perpetual Swap-Mar 2021 Swap at say -400? All of a sudden that looks different; in one leg you’re effectively short Bitcoin vs. long in another. Your risk is entirely on the price-differential, and hence it’s likely to move less than just the price of Bitcoin (lower beta), encouraging you to take a view, and perhaps with greater leverage. And in doing so, you’re providing interest to a Mar 2021 BTC futures contract that may have otherwise run dry.

Implied Orderbooks

But these products will fall flat on their face, unless they are deployed correctly, and for that you need implied orderbooks. What this simply means is that at anytime you see a futures swap price, it is directly intertwined to the liquidity of the underlying orderbooks.
Screenshot of Alpha5 interface illustrating swap prices
In this example above you see a Swap Price of -516.5/-515.5. That price is actually being aggregated from two individual futures. Meaning, if you trade the swap, you trade two futures. This is key. Because what you are doing is not only providing interest in any particular maturity, but also providing liquidity. 1+1 = More.
In the example in the previous section, if you traded the [Perpetual Swap — Mar 2021 Future] Swap without implied orderbooks, you simply get a ‘Mark Price’ reference at which you are marked for each individual leg of the Swap, and no individual legs need to be traded. But if that same price were implemented with implieds, you will have traded each individual leg in both orderbooks. This means the March orderbook actually was matched for a real trade against someone doing something completely different! There is beauty here because there is a non-linear building of liquidity with each additional contract.
Imagine you have 3 contracts available to trade:
  • Perpetual Swap
  • September Future
  • December Future
With implied orderbooks, you will have 3 additional contracts created (Perp-Sep, Perp-Dec, Sep-Dec), without needing any additional liquidity, for a total of 6 contracts.
And the general interpolation of this would look like:
https://preview.redd.it/69ckm670k1q51.png?width=1400&format=png&auto=webp&s=d3b44485bb2a9c761efcdd94c4e51e3f347f861e
For every additional product that you add, you create a synergistic relationship between many more!
Having Implied Orderbooks and Swap Contracts is a very powerful tool, especially in a market that is completely imbalanced with regards to where it anchors liquidity. Alpha5 is proud to be a first mover, and looks forward to helping drive liquidity for the benefit of the ecosystem.
___________________
To learn more about Alpha5 and keep up-to-date with the latest news, visit our website and sign up for our newsletter at https://alpha5.io.
Follow along or contact the team with your inquiries:

submitted by alpha5_io to u/alpha5_io [link] [comments]

The Silver Crash Is Here

This email is for documentation of a transaction
Today I bought Silver Viper Minerals (VIPRF) for $0.4196. It is incredibly low on the stochastics.
Who out there is enjoying my silver crash prediction? Get your cash ready.
Daily chart. Weekly chart. Next week it will be up but after that it will continue to drop.
Bitcoin is coming down like I said but not low enough. I'd give it another week or two before it really starts to move toward the $8,5000 area.
Hopefully in a few days I'll be shorting corn. I'll give an update then.
http://lists.apisbull.com/cgi-bin/dada/mail.cgi/archive/activitynotices/20200923185121/
Be sure to check out my
Youtube channel
Twitter
Trading History
Newsletter archives are located at http://lists.apisbull.com/cgi-bin/dada/mail.cgi/list/activitynotices/
Main Page
submitted by ApisBullTrading to u/ApisBullTrading [link] [comments]

Ely Gold Royalties Bottoming Out

http://lists.apisbull.com/cgi-bin/dada/mail.cgi/archive/activitynotices/20200922145519/

Just bought Ely Gold Royalties (ELYGF) at $0.8975 today. Didn't even plan on it. I was going through a list of gold and silver stocks and Ely Gold on the charts was pretty low on the stochastics and money flow for daily and weekly.
See the daily chart
See the weekly chart
In my next video I'll explain in detail why I bought and sold my latest transactions over the past two weeks.
As predicted silver and Bitcoin are falling. Although I see a few up days for silver but the down trend will continue for a couple of months. As for Bitcoin I see a down turn whether slow or fast down to $8,5000.00
Be sure to check out my
Youtube channel
Twitter
Trading History
Newsletter archives are located at http://lists.apisbull.com/cgi-bin/dada/mail.cgi/list/activitynotices/
submitted by ApisBullTrading to u/ApisBullTrading [link] [comments]

SILVER VIPER MINERALS

I'm thinking about buying SILVER VIPER MINERALS (VIPRF). I haven't picked a price yet as I need to see it rise above the 18 day moving average line.
See the chart;SMA(18);COTLC;STOSL(14,3);SRSI(14,20);MFI(14,100);SMACD(12,30,18);SMA(50)&sym=VIPRF&grid=1&height=375&studyheight=100) and see my order
My last silver pick, DEFIANCE SILVER (DNCVF) which I sold a day or two ago resulted in a profit of 59.724% and held it for 27 days.
I am still waiting for Bitcoin to come down to $9,000 or $8,500 as you can see on the daily and monthly charts it is trading at a top.
I still think silver will come down as the charts suggest along with Bitcoin. To rationalize this to fundamental traders who are not technical traders I think the reason will be that Trump will get re-elected and will make policies or actions that will comfort those who are holding dollars but that will be a temporary thing and up again we will go in prices.
See the silver daily and monthly charts.
Trading is about patients and control not about how active you are.

Be sure to check out my
Youtube channel
Twitter
Trading History
Newsletter archives are located at http://lists.apisbull.com/cgi-bin/dada/mail.cgi/list/activitynotices/
Main Page
submitted by ApisBullTrading to u/ApisBullTrading [link] [comments]

/r/Scams Common Scam Master Post

Hello visitors and subscribers of scams! Here you will find a master list of common (and uncommon) scams that you may encounter online or in real life. Thank you to the many contributors who helped create this thread!

If you know of a scam that is not covered here, write a comment and it will be added to the next edition.

Previous threads: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/search?q=common+scams+master+post&restrict_sr=on
Blackmail email scam thread: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/g8jqnthe_blackmail_email_scam_part_5//
Some of these articles are from small, local publications and refer to the scam happening in a specific area. Do not think that this means that the scam won't happen in your area.

Spoofing

Caller ID spoofing
It is very easy for anyone to make a phone call while having any number show up on the caller ID of the person receiving the phone call. Receiving a phone call from a certain number does not mean that the person/company who owns that number has actually called you.
Email spoofing
The "from" field of an email can be set by the sender, meaning that you can receive scam emails that look like they are from legitimate addresses. It's important to never click links in emails unless absolutely necessary, for example a password reset link you requested or an account activation link for an account you created.
SMS spoofing
SMS messages can be spoofed, so be wary of messages that seem to be from your friends or other trusted people.

The most common scams

The fake check scam (Credit to nimble2 for this part)
The fake check scam arises from many different situations (for instance, you applied for a job, or you are selling something on a place like Craigslist, or someone wants to purchase goods or services from your business, or you were offered a job as a mystery shopper, you were asked to wrap your car with an advertisement, or you received a check in the mail for no reason), but the bottom line is always something like this:
General fraudulent funds scams If somebody is asking you to accept and send out money as a favour or as part of a job, it is a fraudulent funds scam. It does not matter how they pay you, any payment on any service can be fraudulent and will be reversed when it is discovered to be fraudulent.
Phone verification code scams Someone will ask you to receive a verification text and then tell you to give them the code. Usually the code will come from Google Voice, or from Craigslist. In the Google version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Google Voice account that the scammer will use to scam people with. In the Craigslist version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Craigslist posting that the scammer will use to scam people. There is also an account takeover version of this scam that will involve the scammer sending a password reset token to your phone number and asking you for it.
Bitcoin job scams
Bitcoin job scams involve some sort of fraudulent funds transfer, usually a fake check although a fraudulent bank transfer can be used as well. The scammer will send you the fraudulent money and ask you to purchase bitcoins. This is a scam, and you will have zero recourse after you send the scammer bitcoins.
Email flooding
If you suddenly receive hundreds or thousands of spam emails, usually subscription confirmations, it's very likely that one of your online accounts has been taken over and is being used fraudulently. You should check any of your accounts that has a credit card linked to it, preferably from a computer other than the one you normally use. You should change all of your passwords to unique passwords and you should start using two factor authentication everywhere.
Boss/CEO scam A scammer will impersonate your boss or someone who works at your company and will ask you to run an errand for them, which will usually be purchasing gift cards and sending them the code. Once the scammer has the code, you have no recourse.
Employment certification scams
You will receive a job offer that is dependent on you completing a course or receiving a certification from a company the scammer tells you about. The scammer operates both websites and the job does not exist.
Craigslist fake payment scams
Scammers will ask you about your item that you have listed for sale on a site like Craigslist, and will ask to pay you via Paypal. They are scamming you, and the payment in most cases does not actually exist, the email you received was sent by the scammers. In cases where you have received a payment, the scammer can dispute the payment or the payment may be entirely fraudulent. The scammer will then either try to get you to send money to them using the fake funds that they did not send to you, or will ask you to ship the item, usually to a re-shipping facility or a parcel mule.
General fraudulent funds scams The fake check scam is not the only scam that involves accepting fraudulent/fake funds and purchasing items for scammers. If your job or opportunity involves accepting money and then using that money, it is almost certainly a frauduent funds scam. Even if the payment is through a bank transfer, Paypal, Venmo, Zelle, Interac e-Transfer, etc, it does not matter.
Credit card debt scam
Fraudsters will offer to pay off your bills, and will do so with fraudulent funds. Sometimes it will be your credit card bill, but it can be any bill that can be paid online. Once they pay it off, they will ask you to send them money or purchase items for them. The fraudulent transaction will be reversed in the future and you will never be able to keep the money. This scam happens on sites like Craigslist, Twitter, Instagram, and also some dating sites, including SeekingArrangement.
The parcel mule scam
A scammer will contact you with a job opportunity that involves accepting and reshipping packages. The packages are either stolen or fraudulently obtained items, and you will not be paid by the scammer. Here is a news article about a scam victim who fell for this scam and reshipped over 20 packages containing fraudulently acquired goods.
The Skype sex scam
You're on Facebook and you get a friend request from a cute girl you've never met. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. She'll ask you to send pictures or videos or get on webcam where she can see you naked with your face in the picture. The scam: There's no girl. You've sent nudes to a guy pretending to be a girl. As soon as he has the pictures he'll demand money and threaten to send the pictures to your friends and family. Sometimes the scammer will upload the video to a porn site or Youtube to show that they are serious.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: You cannot buy silence, you can only rent it. Paying the blackmailer will show them that the information they have is valuable and they will come after you for more money. Let your friends and family know that you were scammed and tell them to ignore friend requests or messages from people they don't know. Also, make sure your privacy settings are locked down and consider deactivating your account.
The underage girl scam
You're on a dating site or app and you get contacted by a cute girl. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. Eventually she stops communicating and you get a call from a pissed off guy claiming to be the girl's father, or a police officer, or a private investigator, or something else along those lines. Turns out the girl you were sexting is underage, and her parents want some money for various reasons, such as to pay for a new phone, to pay for therapy, etc. There is, of course, no girl. You were communicating with a scammer.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: Stop picking up the phone when the scammers call. Do not pay them, or they will be after you for more money.
Phishing
Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick you into giving information to them, such as your password or private financial information. Phishing messages will usually look very similar to official messages, and sometimes they are identical. If you are ever required to login to a different account in order to use a service, you should be incredibly cautious.
The blackmail email scam The exact wording of the emails varies, but there are generally four main parts. They claim to have placed software/malware on a porn/adult video site, they claim to have a video of you masturbating or watching porn, they threaten to release the video to your friends/family/loved ones/boss/dog, and they demand that you pay them in order for them to delete the video. Rest assured that this is a very common spam campaign and there is no truth behind the email or the threats. Here are some news articles about this scam.
The blackmail mail scam
This is very similar to the blackmail email scam, but you will receive a letter in the mail.
Rental scams Usually on local sites like Craigslist, scammers will steal photos from legitimate real estate listings and will list them for rent at or below market rate. They will generally be hesitant to tell you the address of the property for "safety reasons" and you will not be able to see the unit. They will then ask you to pay them a deposit and they claim they will ship you the keys. In reality, your money is gone and you will have no recourse.
Craigslist vehicle scams A scammer will list a vehicle on Craigslist and will offer to ship you the car. In many cases they will also falsely claim to sell you the car through eBay or Amazon. If you are looking for a car on Craigslist and the seller says anything about shipping the car, having an agent, gives you a long story about why they are selling the car, or the listing price is far too low, you are talking to a scammer and you should ignore and move on.
Advance-fee scam, also known as the 419 scam, or the Nigerian prince scam. You will receive a communication from someone who claims that you are entitled to a large sum of money, or you can help them obtain a large sum of money. However, they will need money from you before you receive the large sum.
Man in the middle scams
Man in the middle scams are very common and very hard to detect. The scammer will impersonate a company or person you are legitimately doing business with, and they will ask you to send the money to one of their own bank accounts or one controlled by a money mule. They have gained access to the legitimate persons email address, so there will be nothing suspicious about the email. To prevent this, make contact in a different way that lets you verify that the person you are talking to is the person you think you are talking to.
Cam girl voting/viewer scam
You will encounter a "cam girl" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to go to their site and sign up with your credit card. They may offer a free show, or ask you to vote for them, or any number of other fake stories.
Amateur porn recruitment scam
You will encounter a "pornstar" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to create an adult film with hehim, but first you need to do something. The story here is usually something to do with verifying your age, or you needing to take an STD test that involves sending money to a site operated by the scammer.
Hot girl SMS spam
You receive a text from a random number with a message along the lines of "Hey babe I'm here in town again if you wanted to meet up this time, are you around?" accompanied by a NSFW picture of a hot girl. It's spam, and they'll direct you to their scam website that requires a credit card.
Identity verification scam
You will encounter someone on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask that you verify your identity as they are worried about catfishing. The scammer operates the site, and you are not talking to whoever you think you are talking to.
This type of scam teases you with something, then tries to make you sign up for something else that costs money. The company involved is often innocent, but they turn a blind eye to the practice as it helps their bottom line, even if they have to occasionally issue refunds. A common variation takes place on dating sites/dating apps, where you will match with someone who claims to be a camgirl who wants you to sign up for a site and vote for her. Another variation takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where the scammers setup fake rental scams and demand that you go through a specific service for a credit check. Once you go through with it, the scammer will stop talking to you. Another variation also takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where scammers will contact you while you are selling a car and will ask you to purchase a Carfax-like report from a specific website.
Multi Level Marketing or Affiliate Marketing
You apply for a vague job listing for 'sales' on craigslist. Or maybe an old friend from high school adds you on Facebook and says they have an amazing business opportunity for you. Or maybe the well dressed guy who's always interviewing people in the Starbucks that you work at asks if you really want to be slinging coffee the rest of your life. The scam: MLMs are little more than pyramid schemes. They involve buying some sort of product (usually snake oil health products like body wraps or supplements) and shilling them to your friends and family. They claim that the really money is recruiting people underneath you who give you a slice of whatever they sell. And if those people underneath you recruit more people, you get a piece of their sales. Ideally if you big enough pyramid underneath you the money will roll in without any work on your part. Failure to see any profit will be your fault for not "wanting it enough." The companies will claim that you need to buy their extra training modules or webinars to really start selling. But in reality, the vast majority of people who buy into a MLM won't see a cent. At the end of the day all you'll be doing is annoying your friends and family with your constant recruitment efforts. What to look out for: Recruiters love to be vague. They won't tell you the name of the company or what exactly the job will entail. They'll pump you up with promises of "self-generating income", "being your own boss", and "owning your own company." They might ask you to read books about success and entrepreneurs. They're hoping you buy into the dream first. If you get approached via social media, check their timelines. MLMs will often instruct their victims to pretend that they've already made it. They'll constantly post about how they're hustling and making the big bucks and linking to youtube videos about success. Again, all very vague about what their job actually entails. If you think you're being recruited: Ask them what exactly the job is. If they can't answer its probably a MLM. Just walk away.

Phone scams

You should generally avoid answering or engaging with random phone calls. Picking up and engaging with a scam call tells the scammers that your phone number is active, and will usually lead to more calls.
Tax Call
You get a call from somebody claiming to be from your countries tax agency. They say you have unpaid taxes that need to be paid immediately, and you may be arrested or have other legal action taken against you if it is not paid. This scam has caused the American IRS, Canadian CRA, British HMRC, and Australian Tax Office to issue warnings. This scam happens in a wide variety of countries all over the world.
Warrant Call
Very similar to the tax call. You'll get a phone call from an "agent", "officer", "sheriff", or other law enforcement officer claiming that there is a warrant out for your arrest and you will be arrested very soon. They will then offer to settle everything for a fee, usually paid in giftcards.
[Legal Documents/Process Server Calls]
Very similar to the warrant call. You'll get a phone call from a scammer claiming that they are going to serve you legal documents, and they will threaten you with legal consequences if you refuse to comply. They may call themselves "investigators", and will sometimes give you a fake case number.
Student Loan Forgiveness Scam
Scammers will call you and tell you about a student loan forgiveness program, but they are interested in obtaining private information about you or demanding money in order to join the fake program.
Tech Support Call You receive a call from someone with a heavy accent claiming to be a technician Microsoft or your ISP. They inform you that your PC has a virus and your online banking and other accounts may be compromised if the virus is not removed. They'll have you type in commands and view diagnostics on your PC which shows proof of the virus. Then they'll have you install remote support software so the technician can work on your PC, remove the virus, and install security software. The cost of the labor and software can be hundreds of dollars. The scam: There's no virus. The technician isn't a technician and does not work for Microsoft or your ISP. Scammers (primarily out of India) use autodialers to cold-call everyone in the US. Any file they point out to you or command they have you run is completely benign. The software they sell you is either freeware or ineffective. What to do you if you're involved with this scam: If the scammers are remotely on your computer as you read this, turn off your PC or laptop via the power button immediately, and then if possible unplug your internet connection. Some of the more vindictive tech scammers have been known to create boot passwords on your computer if they think you've become wise to them and aren't going to pay up. Hang up on the scammers, block the number, and ignore any threats about payment. Performing a system restore on your PC is usually all that is required to remove the scammer's common remote access software. Reports of identity theft from fake tech calls are uncommon, but it would still be a good idea to change your passwords for online banking and monitor your accounts for any possible fraud. How to avoid: Ignore any calls claiming that your PC has a virus. Microsoft will never contact you. If you're unsure if a call claiming to be from your ISP is legit, hang up, and then dial the customer support number listed on a recent bill. If you have elderly relatives or family that isn't tech savvy, take the time to fill them in on this scam.
Chinese government scam
This scam is aimed at Chinese people living in Europe and North America, and involves a voicemail from someone claiming to be associated with the Chinese government, usually through the Chinese consulate/embassy, who is threatening legal action or making general threats.
Chinese shipping scam
This scam is similar to the Chinese government scam, but involves a seized/suspicious package, and the scammers will connect the victim to other scammers posing as Chinese government investigators.
Social security suspension scam
You will receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government regarding suspicious activity, fraud, or serious crimes connected to your social security number. You'll be asked to speak to an operator and the operator will explain the steps you need to follow in order to fix the problems. It's all a scam, and will lead to you losing money and could lead to identity theft if you give them private financial information.
Utilities cutoff
You get a call from someone who claims that they are from your utility company, and they claim that your utilities will be shut off unless you immediately pay. The scammer will usually ask for payment via gift cards, although they may ask for payment in other ways, such as Western Union or bitcoin.
Relative in custody Scammer claims to be the police, and they have your son/daughtenephew/estranged twin in custody. You need to post bail (for some reason in iTunes gift cards or MoneyGram) immediately or the consequences will never be the same.
Mexican family scam
This scam comes in many different flavours, but always involves someone in your family and Mexico. Sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been detained, sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been kidnapped, and sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member is injured and needs help.
General family scams
Scammers will gather a large amount of information about you and target your family members using different stories with the goal of gettimg them to send money.
One ring scam
Scammers will call you from an international number with the goal of getting you to return their call, causing you to incur expensive calling fees.

Online shopping scams

THE GOLDEN RULE OF ONLINE SHOPPING: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Dropshipping
An ad on reddit or social media sites like Facebook and Instagram offers items at huge discounts or even free (sometimes requiring you to reblog or like their page). They just ask you to pay shipping. The scam: The item will turn out to be very low quality and will take weeks or even months to arrive. Sometimes the item never arrives, and the store disappears or stops responding. The seller drop-ships the item from China. The item may only cost a few dollars, and the Chinese government actually pays for the shipping. You end up paying $10-$15 dollars for a $4 item, with the scammer keeping the profit. If you find one of these scams but really have your heart set on the item, you can find it on AliExpress or another Chinese retailer.
Influencer scams
A user will reach out to you on a social media platform, usually Instagram, and offer you the chance to partner with them and receive a free/discounted product, as long as you pay shipping. This is a different version of the dropshipping scam, and is just a marketing technique to get you to buy their products.
Triangulation fraud
Triangulation fraud occurs when you make a purchase on a site like Amazon or eBay for an item at a lower than market price, and receive an item that was clearly purchased new at full price. The scammer uses a stolen credit card to order your item, while the money from the listing is almost all profit for the scammer.
Instagram influencer scams
Someone will message you on Instagram asking you to promote their products, and offering you a discount code. The items are Chinese junk, and the offer is made to many people at a time.
Cheap Items
Many websites pop up and offer expensive products, including electronics, clothes, watches, sunglasses, and shoes at very low prices. The scam: Some sites are selling cheap knock-offs. Some will just take your money and run. What to do if you think you're involved with this scam: Contact your bank or credit card and dispute the charge. How to avoid: The sites often have every brand-name shoe or fashion item (Air Jordan, Yeezy, Gucci, etc) in stock and often at a discounted price. The site will claim to be an outlet for a major brand or even a specific line or item. The site will have images at the bottom claiming to be Secured by Norton or various official payment processors but not actual links. The site will have poor grammar and a mish-mash of categories. Recently, established websites will get hacked or their domain name jacked and turned into scam stores, meaning the domain name of the store will be completely unrelated to the items they're selling. If the deal sounds too good to be true it probably is. Nobody is offering brand new iPhones or Beats or Nintendo Switches for 75% off.
Cheap Amazon 3rd Party Items
You're on Amazon or maybe just Googling for an item and you see it for an unbelievable price from a third-party seller. You know Amazon has your back so you order it. The scam: One of three things usually happen: 1) The seller marks the items as shipped and sends a fake tracking number. Amazon releases the funds to the seller, and the seller disappears. Amazon ultimately refunds your money. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to re-order the item directly from their website, usually with the guarantee that the order is still protected by Amazon. The seller takes your money and runs. Amazon informs you that they do not offer protection on items sold outside of Amazon and cannot help you. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to instead send payment via an unused Amazon gift card by sending the code on the back via email. Once the seller uses the code, the money on the card is gone and cannot be refunded. How to avoid: These scammers can be identified by looking at their Amazon storefronts. They'll be brand new sellers offering a wide range of items at unbelievable prices. Usually their Amazon names will be gibberish, or a variation on FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME. Occasionally however, established storefronts will be hacked. If the deal is too good to be true its most likely a scam.
Scams on eBay
There are scams on eBay targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who privately message you regarding the order, especially if they ask you to ship to a different address or ask to negotiate via text/email/a messaging service. As a buyer you should look out for new accounts selling in-demand items, established accounts selling in-demand items that they have no previous connection to (you can check their feedback history for a general idea of what they bought/sold in the past), and lookout for people who ask you to go off eBay and use another service to complete the transaction. In many cases you will receive a fake tracking number and your money will be help up for up to a month.
Scams on Amazon
There are scams on Amazon targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who message you about a listing. As a buyer you should look out for listings that have an email address for you to contact the person to complete the transaction, and you should look out for cheap listings of in-demand items.
Scams on Reddit
Reddit accounts are frequently purchased and sold by fraudsters who wish to use the high karma count + the age of the account to scam people on buy/sell subreddits. You need to take precautions and be safe whenever you are making a transaction online.
Computer scams
Virus scam
A popup or other ad will say that you have a virus and you need to follow their advice in order to remove it. They are lying, and either want you to install malware or pay for their software.

Assorted scams

Chinese Brushing / direct shipping
If you have ever received an unsolicited small package from China, your address was used to brush. Vendors place fake orders for their own products and send out the orders so that they can increase their ratings.
Money flipping
Scammer claims to be a banking insider who can double/triple/bazoople any amount of money you send them, with no consequences of any kind. Obviously, the money disappears into their wallet the moment you send it.

Door to door scams

As a general rule, you should not engage with door to door salesmen. If you are interested in the product they are selling, check online first.
Selling Magazines
Someone or a group will come to your door and offer to sell a magazine subscription. Often the subscriptions are not for the duration or price you were told, and the magazines will often have tough or impossible cancellation policies.
Energy sales
Somebody will come to your door claiming to be from an energy company. They will ask to see your current energy bill so that they can see how much you pay. They will then offer you a discount if you sign up with them, and promise to handle everything with your old provider. Some of these scammers will "slam" you, by using your account number that they saw on your bill to switch you to their service without authorization, and some will scam you by charging higher prices than the ones you agreed on.
Security system scams
Scammers will come to your door and ask about your security system, and offer to sell you a new one. These scammers are either selling you overpriced low quality products, or are casing your home for a future burglary.
They ask to enter your home
While trying to sell you whatever, they suddenly need to use your bathroom, or they've been writing against the wall and ask to use your table instead. Or maybe they just moved into the neighborhood and want to see how you decorate for ideas.
They're scoping out you and your place. They want to see what valuables you have, how gullible you are, if you have a security system or dogs, etc.

Street scams

Begging With a Purpose
"I just need a few more dollars for the bus," at the bus station, or "I just need $5 to get some gas," at a gas station. There's also a variation where you will be presented with a reward: "I just need money for a cab to get uptown, but I'll give you sports tickets/money/a date/a priceless vase."
Three Card Monte, Also Known As The Shell Game
Unbeatable. The people you see winning are in on the scam.
Drop and Break
You bump into someone and they drop their phone/glasses/fancy bottle of wine/priceless vase and demand you pay them back. In reality, it's a $2 pair of reading glasses/bottle of three-buck-chuck/tasteful but affordable vase.
CD Sales
You're handed a free CD so you can check out the artist's music. They then ask for your name and immediately write it on the CD. Once they've signed your name, they ask you for money, saying they can't give it to someone else now. Often they use dry erase markers, or cheap CD sleeves. Never use any type of storage device given to you by a random person, as the device can contain malware.
White Van Speaker Scam
You're approached and offered speakers/leather jackets/other luxury goods at a discount. The scammer will have an excuse as to why the price is so low. After you buy them, you'll discover that they are worthless.
iPhone Street Sale
You're approached and shown an iPhone for sale, coming in the box, but it's open and you can see the phone. If you buy the phone, you'll get an iPhone box with no iPhone, just some stones or cheap metal in it to weigh it down.
Buddhist Monk Pendant
A monk in traditional garb approaches you, hands you a gold trinket, and asks for a donation. He holds either a notebook with names and amounts of donation (usually everyone else has donated $5+), or a leaflet with generic info. This is fairly common in NYC, and these guys get aggressive quickly.
Friendship Bracelet Scam More common in western Europe, you're approached by someone selling bracelets. They quickly wrap a loop of fabric around your finger and pull it tight, starting to quickly weave a bracelet. The only way to (easily) get it off your hand is to pay. Leftover sales
This scam involves many different items, but the idea is usually the same: you are approached by someone who claims to have a large amount of excess inventory and offers to sell it to you at a great price. The scammer actually has low quality items and will lie to you about the price/origin of the items.
Dent repair scams
Scammers will approach you in public about a dent in your car and offer to fix it for a low price. Often they will claim that they are mechanics. They will not fix the dent in your car, but they will apply large amounts of wax or other substances to hide the dent while they claim that the substance requires time to harden.
Gold ring/jewelry/valuable item scam
A scammer will "find" a gold ring or other valuable item and offers to sell it to you. The item is fake and you will never see the scammer again.
Distraction theft
One person will approach you and distract you, while their accomplice picks your pockets. The distraction can take many forms, but if you are a tourist and are approached in public, watch closely for people getting close to you.

General resources

Site to report scams in the United Kingdom: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
Site to report scams in the United States: https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
Site to report scams in Canada: www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm
Site to report scams in Europe: https://www.europol.europa.eu/report-a-crime/report-cybercrime-online
FTC scam alerts: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts
Microsoft's anti-scam guide: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds
https://www.usa.gov/scams-and-frauds
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts
https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes
submitted by EugeneBYMCMB to Scams [link] [comments]

dxDAO aims to power DeFi protocols through decentralized governance

I found this article on internet. It's repost of it to help educate people about all DXDao advantages:
These are positive and necessary steps for DeFi. The new governance structures are intended to help coordinate across community stakeholders and make better decisions. These dynamics are influenced by the issues covered in Dose of DeFi, but I believe they deserve their own focused analysis.
Govern This aims to educate token holders and make them better voters. Emphasis will be placed on specific governance proposals and relaying community governance discussions on forums and weekly calls.
Governance is a coordination technology that has helped countries and companies build more than the sum of their parts. Blockchains are also a coordination technology, but for computers, not humans***.*** Govern This will track the development of the melding of these two over the coming years.
Like governance, Govern This is a work in progress. I would appreciate any feedback on format, topics covered or any other suggestions to make the newsletter better. Just hit reply.
The first issue of Govern This is below. Please click here to subscribe.
Thanks for reading,
Chris
📷
dxDAO aims to power DeFi protocols through decentralized governance
Gnosis launched a long-awaited DEX last week with batched auctions for low-liquidity trade pairs. The front-end, Mesa.Eth.Link is owned and operated by dxDAO, a decentralized collective that hopes to power other DeFi protocols.
While dYdX does not have any specific governance plans (yet), this tweet from dYdX founder Antonio Juliano is a common approach to governance.
📷Antonio Juliano @AntonioMJuliano3) 0x should focus less on governance in the short term. It’s way more important to first build something with a large amount of adoption that’s worth governing
December 6th 2018
3 Retweets62 Likes
The tweet at the end of 2018 was in response to 0x and its native token, ZRX. The project was popular but the token had no use case outside of governance.
This governance strategy – build now, decentralize later – is widely accepted in the space and is perhaps best exemplified by the A16Z’s Jesse Walden’s post, “Progressive Decentralization: A Playbook for Building Crypto Applications”, which the A16Z-backed Compound has essentially implemented (more in the section below).
dxDAO, on the other hand, maintains that decentralization must come at the beginning or else the core team and investors will have an outsized influence on the project in formal (token voting) or informal ways (dictators for life).
Background
dxDAO was launched in May 2019, spun out of a collaboration between Gnosis and DAOstack over managing the DutchX platform. dxDAO’s key governance design is separating financial rights to the DAO (DXD) from voting power over the DAO (Reputation). It used an Edgeware-style lock drop to distribute reputation to stakeholders in May of last year. Any user could lock up ETH or an accepted ERC-20 for a month and receive Reputation, which are voting rights in dxDAO, even though it is not a token and cannot be transferred.
Over 400 unique Ethereum addresses participated in the distribution scheme. Gnosis went through a pretty extensive process in July 2019 to “step back” from its involvement in the DAO, and since then, the community and dxDAO have aligned behind a mission of “putting the ‘De’ in Decentralized Finance”.
Following on last week’s launch of Mesa.ETH.Link, dxDAO is conducting a fundraiser or (“DAICO”?) to help fund its new slate of DeFi products, including a prediction market platform (Omen) and a privacy-centric DeFi dashboard (Mix).
Project launch is typically when a project is most centralized. Execution is hard and direction and accountability are important. dxDAO’s approach will be an interesting counterexample to the “decentralize later” trend and may provide insight into new governance strategies.
Click here for more information about the dxDAO fundraiser.
Here’s what is on the dxDAO docket this week:
Compound governance goes live, has it found Market-Protocol-Fit?
Since its founding in 2017, Compound has executed with an almost flawless record: no bugs/hacks, a major protocol upgrade and a big name fundraise (twice).
But all of that has been because Compound, the company, has executed well, but can protocol development and the growth of the platform be sustained with community management? We shall see.
Compound’s governance system could not be simpler. Anyone with at least 1% of COMP can submit a proposal of executable code. COMP holders have a 3 day voting period; the proposal passes with a majority of token votes AND a 4% quorum of all COMP tokens.
The 1% minimum for proposal submission is a good anti-Sybil mechanism but it greatly limits participation by small users. There is delegation, so you could imagine a “proposal petition” where you would delegate your COMP to a proposal instead of signing your name.
Compound is clearly taking the “less governance is the best governance” approach. This has worked surprisingly well with Bitcoin and Ethereum, which of course, do not have any formal governance, but those communities clearly have informal governance systems that make decisions.
The biggest governance question for Compound: who is the community?
Market-Protocol-Fit
Other Internet has an intriguing essay on the emergent order from new blockchain tokens and their communities. It is worth a read. It discusses the emergent iteration that blockchains – as a technology and a community – go through to find a niche, both in culture and product.
While it focuses on base-layer blockchains that launch with a token, the essay underscores the most underrated governance element: token distribution. It quotes an insightful tweet from Eric Wall
📷Eric Wall @ercwlA question that keeps me up at night: Is it possible to create a rubbish coin based on advanced bullshit, build a community of misguided fans nevertheless, run it centralized for 5 yrs, hardfork-copy the design of a real working project, keep the community and become a success?
keysheet @keysheet
@ErcWll was one of the first vocal critics of IOTA back in 2017, shortly before the project hit a market cap of $15B. https://t.co/2267e8LEpl Today, the project is down 99% and appears to be brutally falling apart. A thread:
February 13th 2020
17 Retweets163 Likes
Before Bitcoin could harden its code and find ‘Digital Gold’ and before Ethereum found ‘DeFi’ and ships ETH2.0, both needed to find a “a strong community of believers” in order to create a “virtuous cycle between headless brands and infrastructural build-out to progressively realize [their] initial promise.”
Communities are connected through a wide spread token distribution, Bitcoin through cypherpunks and online drugs and Ethereum through a global ICO (what Teo Leibowitz called “The Immaculate ICO”).
$COMP distribution
The biggest “news” has been details about $COMP distribution:
There are no explicit plans yet, but the widely held assumption is that the COMP distribution will be determined by the interest earned and paid by users on the protocol since its inception. This is a clever way that only incentivizes more use of the protocol and is hard to game because interests accrues over time.
But the question still remains, what will the COMP community look like and what values will it espouse? Can emergent cultures arise out of Silicon Valley too?
Here’s what is on the Compound docket this week:
Maker and wBTC, a test case for the MIP process
While Maker had planned to spend Q2 moving forward with their upgraded governance process, most of its focus has been on restoring the Dai peg.
For more on how the Maker governance process has expanded outside the core community, check out the previous edition of Govern This.
Here’s what is on the Maker docket this week:
Governance and Risk meeting (April 23)
Single Collateral Dai shutdown – the process has begun. A poll passed with May 12 as the official SCD shutdown. Just yesterday, an executive just passed yesterday to make the MKR oracle fee-less, which will help with migration. Many in the community think the migration of debt from SCD will do more than enough to restore the peg.
13 MIPs and 2 sub proposals – Core to the new Maker governance process is the “Maker Improvement Proposals (MIPs), which are modeled off of BIPs (for Bitcoin) and EIPs (for Ethereum). The two sub-proposals are to appoint the Smart Contracts Team and assign Charles St. Louis as the MIP editor.
The 13 MIPs are listed below:
- MIP1 (Maker Governance Paradigms)- MIP2 (Launch Period)- MIP3 (Governance Cycle)- MIP4 (MIP Amendment and Removal Process)- MIP5 (Emergency Voting System)- MIP6 (Collateral Onboarding Form/Forum Template)- MIP7 (Onboarding and Offboarding Domain Teams for Collateral Onboarding)- MIP8 (Domain Greenlight)- MIP9 (Community Greenlight)- MIP10 (Oracle Management)- MIP11 (Collateral Onboarding General Risk Model Management)- MIP12 (Collateral and Risk Parameter Management)
By and large, the MIPs codify many of the informal Maker governance processes. There is currently a request for comments period (MIP forum) and there will be an informal poll on Monday, April 27 on whether to proceed with the 13 MIPs and 2 sub proposals. If it’s a “Yes”, than an executive for an official ratification vote would start on May 1 and lasts for 4 days. If it passes, the official governance cycle will begin and the rest of the MIPs will likely be approved from May 4 – 6.
Other Governing Things
That’s it! Feedback definitely appreciated. Just hit reply. Written in Brooklyn where it rained all day. No euchre today, but yesterday was epic.
Govern This is written by Chris Powers. Opinions expressed are my own. All content is for informational purposes and is not intended as investment advice.
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Megathread: Mueller indicts 12 Russians for hacking into DNC

Special counsel Robert Mueller indicted 12 Russians on Friday, and accused them of hacking into the Democratic National Committee to sabotage the 2016 presidential election.
The indictments, announced by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, come just days before a scheduled Monday summit in Helsinki between Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin.
A copy of the indictment can be found on the DOJ website here: https://www.justice.gov/file/1080281/download

Submissions that may interest you

SUBMISSION DOMAIN
Mueller probe indicts 12 Russians for hacking Democrats in 2016 washingtonpost.com
Rosenstein says 12 Russian intel officers indicted in special counsel's probe foxnews.com
Mueller Indicts 12 Russian Officers for Hacking Dems in 2016 thedailybeast.com
US indicts 12 Russians for hacking DNC emails during the 2016 election theguardian.com
Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein Unveils New Hacking Charges In DNC Case npr.org
Special counsel Mueller charges 12 Russian intelligence officers with hacking Democrats during 2016 election cnbc.com
New indictments expected in Mueller special counsel probe: CNN reuters.com
12 Russian Intelligence Officials Indicted by U.S. Government bloomberg.com
Mueller indicts 12 Russians for hacking into DNC politico.com
12 Russian Intelligence Officers Charged Over 2016 Election Hacking time.com
Russia investigation: 12 Russian nationals indicted for 2016 hacking usatoday.com
Mueller indicts 12 Russians in 2016 DNC hack thehill.com
12 Russian intel officers indicted for DNC hacking in Mueller investigation abcnews.go.com
U.S. v. Viktor Borisovich Netyksho, et al (District of Columbia) justice.gov
12 Russian Intelligence Officers Indicted in Hacking Tied to the Clinton Campaign nytimes.com
Mueller indicts 12 Russian military officers for DNC hacking dallasnews.com
12 Russians indicted for hacking the 2016 election. bbc.com
Rod Rosenstein expected to announce new indictments by Robert Mueller washingtonpost.com
Mueller Slaps 12 Russians with Indictments for 2016 DNC Hack. Here’s What We Know. lawandcrime.com
Mueller indicts 12 Russians for hacking into DNC politico.com
Mueller indicts 12 Russian intelligence agents - Deputy AG Rosenstein holding press conference shortly washingtonpost.com
Mueller investigation indicts 12 Russian intelligence officers axios.com
Russian Intelligence Officers Have Been Indicted For Hacking Hillary Clinton's Presidential Campaign buzzfeed.com
Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein Delivers Remarks Announcing the Indictment of Twelve Russian Intelligence Officers for Conspiring to Interfere in the 2016 Presidential Election Through Computer Hacking and Related Offenses justice.gov
Mueller Indicts 12 Russian Intelligence Officers for Hacking Democrats motherjones.com
Rosenstein announces 12 indictments of Russians in Mueller probe nydailynews.com
12 Russian Intelligence Officers Indicted In Robert Mueller Investigation huffingtonpost.com
Special counsel Mueller charges 12 Russian intelligence officers with hacking Democrats during 2016 election cnbc.com
Read: Mueller indictment against 12 Russian spies for DNC hack vox.com
New Mueller indictments reveal that congressional candidate requested stolen documents from Russian hackers in 2016 businessinsider.com
READ: Mueller indicts 12 Russians in 2016 DNC hacking us.cnn.com
Mueller Indicts 12 Russian Intelligence Officers, Including 'Guccifer 2.0,' For Hacking Democrats motherboard.vice.com
Mueller indictments: Congressional candidate asked Russian operatives for info on opponent thehill.com
12 Russian intelligence officers charged by Mueller in hack of DNC, Clinton emails chicagotribune.com
Mueller's New Indictment Shows Collusion With Russia nymag.com
Mueller Indictment Alleges Candidate For Congress Asked Guccifer 2.0 For Stolen Docs talkingpointsmemo.com
Mueller indicts 12 Russians politico.com
Who's been charged by Mueller in the Russia probe so far? foxnews.com
The timing of Mueller’s Russia indictment is extremely awkward for Trump vox.com
Mueller’s New Indictment Shows Collusion With Russia nymag.com
The Mueller Investigation Keeps Growing Fast fivethirtyeight.com
After Mueller’s Latest Indictment, Trump’s Upcoming Meeting With Putin “Makes For Good TV” buzzfeed.com
The Mueller indictments reveal the timing of the DNC leak was intentional vox.com
Mueller: Congressional candidate sought stolen documents from Russian spies usatoday.com
Indicting 12 Russian Hackers Could Be Mueller's Biggest Move Yet wired.com
Republicans Respond to Latest Mueller Indictment With Desperate Gaslighting thinkprogress.org
Rudy Giuliani: the Mueller indictments are great news for Donald Trump vox.com
A swing-state election vendor repeatedly denied being hacked by Russians. New Mueller indictment says otherwise theintercept.com
Mueller Indictment Raises Real Possibility Reporters Played Foolishly into Russians’ Hands lawandcrime.com
Sanders: Trump should confront Putin over Mueller probe indictments thehill.com
Roger Stone Communicated With Russian Hackers, Mueller Indictment Suggests huffingtonpost.com
Mueller found that the Russian hacker scheme was dependent on bitcoin, and it may have gotten them caught businessinsider.com
The White House offered zero condemnation of Russia in its response to the Mueller indictments vox.com
Mueller: Russian officers launched leaks website in June 2016 thehill.com
New indictments expected in Mueller special counsel probe: CNN reuters.com
12 Russians indicted in Mueller investigation edition.cnn.com
Mueller’s Latest Indictments Show That ‘Witches’ Are Very Real nationalreview.com
The Top Bombshells In Mueller's Indictment Of Russian DNC Hackers huffingtonpost.com
Stone: My Contact With Guccifer 2.0 Detailed In Mueller Indictment Was ‘Benign’ talkingpointsmemo.com
Gowdy Weighs In On Mueller Indictments: 'Russia Is Not Our Friend' thehill.com
What will Mueller's indictment of 12 Russians mean for Trump's Helsinki summit? msnbc.com
Trump's options for bringing up Mueller's indictment with Putin msnbc.com
How the Mueller News Is an Indictment of…Donald Trump and His GOP Enablers motherjones.com
The timing, the proof, the details: Takeaways from Mueller's new indictments nbcnews.com
Mueller Indictment Appears to Make Reference to Roger Stone thehill.com
12 Russians indicted in Mueller investigation, Nebraska's Brad Ashford a victim of the hack wowt.com
Six Big Takeaways from Mueller’s Indictment of Russian Intel Officers justsecurity.org
Mueller indictments link Russian hacking to Florida sun-sentinel.com
Ex-CIA director: Mueller investigation will have 'a widening circle' of indictments cnn.com
Mueller indictment 13 July 2018: "[Russians] posing as Guccifer 2.0... wrote to a person who was in regular contact with senior members of the presidential campaign of Donald J. Trump... The person responded, 'pretty standard'" apps.washingtonpost.com
Kremlin reacts to 12 Russians charged in Mueller probe cnn.com
Mueller indictment sheds new light on Russia's 'nasty' secret election hacking units politico.com
Roger Stone says he’s the 'US person' mentioned in Mueller indictment abcnews.go.com
Mueller: Congressional candidate sought stolen emails from Russian spies in 2016 wsoctv.com
Illinois elections board 'very likely' named in Mueller indictment of Russian hackers, officials say chicagotribune.com
Roger Stone says he’s the 'US person' mentioned in Mueller indictment abcnews.go.com
Giuliani: Can't find basis for Mueller probe edition.cnn.com
Russia Indictment 2.0: What to Make of Mueller’s Hacking Indictment lawfareblog.com
Russian Suing Over Steele Dossier Calls Mueller Indictment An 'Utter Vindication' dailycaller.com
Mueller’s Indictment of Russian Hackers Is Full of Clues About Connections to Trump World slate.com
Stone reverses: I'm 'probably' unnamed person in Mueller indictment thehill.com
Trump should cancel Putin summit after Mueller indictments, Congress says - Business Insider businessinsider.com
Russia probe: Robert Mueller's offers Trump a choice - take on Putin or be branded a coward smh.com.au
‘It's a big FU from Mueller:’ Trump’s allies question timing of latest Mueller indictments — on the eve of the Putin summit. politico.com
Mueller indictment sheds new light on Russia’s ‘nasty’ secret election hacking units politico.eu
Mueller Spells Out Who Helped Russian Spies in 2016 Campaign thedailybeast.com
Malcolm Nance on Mueller indictment: U.S. remains under attack. msnbc.com
Trump resists calls to nix Putin summit after Mueller indictment msnbc.com
Roger Stone: I'm 'probably' unnamed person mentioned in Robert Mueller indictment usatoday.com
Trump responds to Mueller indictments – by blaming Obama - US news theguardian.com
Giuliani: 'The Mueller Investigation Is Falling Apart of Its Own Weight' breitbart.com
Senators called on Trump to cancel his summit with Putin following Mueller's DNC hack indictments newsweek.com
We need to hear more about anti-Trump bias by the FBI and Mueller's team -- House hearing must not be the end foxnews.com
Trump Responds To New Mueller Indictments huffingtonpost.com
5 revelations from Mueller's indictment of Russians in DNC hack thehill.com
After Mueller’s Russian indictments, Trump returns to a familiar line: blame Obama vox.com
What The Latest Mueller Indictment Tells Us About Election Hacking fivethirtyeight.com
Roger Stone: I'm ‘Probably’ Unnamed Person in Mueller’s Indictment thedailybeast.com
Mueller indicts 12 Russians for DNC hacking: Live updates cnn.com
submitted by PoliticsModeratorBot to politics [link] [comments]

Twitter Founder Jack Dorsey interview: Bitcoin BTC Event ... Twitter Founder Jack Dorsey interview: Bitcoin BTC Event ... Twitter Founder Jack Dorsey interview: Bitcoin BTC Event ... Twitter Founder Jack Dorsey interview: Bitcoin BTC Event & Twitter news updates Bitcoin scam: Twitter accounts of Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates, Barack Obama, others hacked  News

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Twitter Founder Jack Dorsey interview: Bitcoin BTC Event ...

🔷Btc: 3GxAJCxba7uY1N4CfymJzLaYaLbx3j611A 🔷site : twitterbtc.com Jack Dorsey (Twitter CEO): In this interview, we will talk about Twitter news, trip to Аfrica... 🔷BTC: 37AcsKNzsBpHeWfjJ4E3vSePT1RrRcbFyW 🔷Site: twitterdrop.live Jack Dorsey (Twitter CEO): In this interview, we will talk about Twitter news, trip to Аfric... Under the very prominent Bitcoin scam which has recently been in a highlight, twitter accounts of major names like Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates, Barack Obama, including Joe Biden, Mike Bloomberg, Kanye ... Jack Dorsey (Twitter CEO and founder): In this interview, we will talk about Twitter news, trip to Аfrica, Cryptocurrencies, Bitcoin, Investments, World Cris... Jack Dorsey (Twitter CEO): In this interview, we will talk about Twitter news, trip to Аfrica, Bitcoin, Investments, World Crisis and more. Twitter website: Twitter.com Official Jack Dorsey ...

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